J. Allen Barber

Joel Allen Barber (January 17, 1809 – June 28, 1881) was an American lawyer and politician. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives from Wisconsin's 3rd congressional district, he was the 15th Speaker of the Wisconsin State Assembly, and he served one term in the Wisconsin State Senate.[1][2][3]

J. Allen Barber
J. Allen Barber (Wisconsin Congressman).jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Wisconsin's 3rd district
In office
March 4, 1871 – March 3, 1875
Preceded byAmasa Cobb
Succeeded byHenry S. Magoon
15th Speaker of the Wisconsin Assembly
In office
January 14, 1863 – January 13, 1864
Preceded byJames W. Beardsley
Succeeded byWilliam W. Field
Member of the Wisconsin Senate
from the 16th district
In office
January 1, 1856 – January 1, 1858
Preceded byNelson Dewey
Succeeded byNoah H. Virgin
Member of the Wisconsin State Assembly
from the Grant 3rd district
In office
January 1, 1863 – January 1, 1865
Preceded byJoseph Trotter Mills
Succeeded byHenry Utt
Member of the Wisconsin State Assembly
from the Grant 5th district
In office
January 1, 1853 – January 1, 1854
Preceded byPosition Established
Succeeded byMilas K. Young
Member of the Wisconsin State Assembly
from the Grant 4th district
In office
January 1, 1852 – January 1, 1853
Preceded byRobert M. Briggs
Succeeded byJeremiah E. Dodge
District Attorney of Grant County
In office
January 1, 1853 – January 1, 1855
Preceded byF. J. Munger
Succeeded byJames M. Goodhue
In office
January 1, 1846 – January 1, 1849
Preceded byJames M. Goodhue
Succeeded byWilliam Biddlecome
In office
January 1, 1840 – January 1, 1844
Preceded byWilliam Hull
Succeeded byWillis H. Chapman
President of the Lancaster Village Board
In office
1875 – May 1878
Preceded byAddison Burr
Succeeded byPosition Abolished
In office
1860–1863
Preceded byJohn Chandler Holloway
Personal details
Born(1809-01-17)January 17, 1809
Georgia, Vermont
DiedJune 28, 1881(1881-06-28) (aged 72)
Lancaster, Wisconsin
Resting placeHillside Cemetery
Lancaster, Wisconsin
Political party
Children2 sons, 2 daughters
MotherAseneth Melvin Barber
FatherJoel Barber

Early life and educationEdit

Barber was born in the town of Georgia, in Franklin County, Vermont, to Joel and Aseneth Melvin Barber.[4] He worked on a farm until age 18, then entered the Georgia Academy. After graduating from the academy, he attended the University of Vermont in Burlington, where he studied law. He left the university after two and a half years and read law with George P. Marsh. He was admitted to the bar in 1833[4] in Prince George's County, Maryland, where he was teaching school, and commenced practice in Fairfield, Vermont.

CareerEdit

Barber moved to the Wisconsin Territory in 1837, settling in Lancaster, in Grant County, where he continued to practice law.[4] He served as county clerk for Grant County, for four years and as district attorney for three terms. He served as member of the first constitutional convention of Wisconsin in 1846.[4]

Barber was elected to the Wisconsin State Assembly in 1852, 1853, as a Whig, in 1863 as a Republican, and, 1864, on the National Union ticket. He was elected speaker for the 1863 session.[4] He also served one two-year term as Grant County's representative in the Wisconsin State Senate in 1856 and 1857.[4]

After establishing a law partnership with George Clementson in 1869, Barber was elected to the United States House of Representatives as a Republican, serving in the Forty-second and Forty-third Congresses from March 4, 1871, to March 3, 1875.[4] He served as the representative of Wisconsin's 3rd congressional district. While Barber was serving in Congress, George Clementson conducted the legal work of their firm. Barber was not a candidate for renomination in 1874, and was succeeded by Henry S. Magoon.[5] Upon leaving Congress, he resumed the practice of law with Clementson.

DeathEdit

Barber died in Lancaster, Wisconsin, June 28, 1881,[4] following an attack of peritonitis[5] and was interred in Hillside Cemetery.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ J. Allen Barber
  2. ^ Butterfield, C. W., ed. (1881). History of Grant County, Wisconsin. Western Historical Company. pp. 875-876. Retrieved October 20, 2019.
  3. ^ Holford, Costello N., ed. (1900). History of Grant County, Wisconsin. The Teller Print. pp. 111–113. Retrieved October 20, 2019.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h "Old Settler Gone". Daily State Gazette. June 30, 1881. p. 1. Retrieved July 4, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.  
  5. ^ a b "Hon. J. Allen Barber". Janesville Daily Gazette. June 29, 1881. p. 1. Retrieved July 5, 2017 – via Newspapers.com.  

SourcesEdit

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Amasa Cobb
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Wisconsin's 3rd congressional district

March 4, 1871 – March 3, 1875
Succeeded by
Henry S. Magoon
Political offices
Preceded by
James W. Beardsley
Speaker of the Wisconsin State Assembly
1863 – 1864
Succeeded by
William W. Field
Legal offices
Preceded by
William Hull
District Attorney of Grant County, Wisconsin
1840 – 1844
Succeeded by
Willis H. Chapman
Preceded by
James M. Goodhue
District Attorney of Grant County, Wisconsin
1846 – 1849
Succeeded by
William Biddlecome
Preceded by
F. J. Munger
District Attorney of Grant County, Wisconsin
1853 – 1855
Succeeded by
James M. Goodhue