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Irene Silverblatt is a professor of cultural anthropology at Duke University. She earned her PhD at the University of Michigan.[1] Her work revolves mainly around the Peruvian experience of race and religion around the seventeenth century and on the last centuries of the Spanish Inquisition. She studies the intersection of the categories of race and religion, and how colonial categories based on them affect the contemporary world. She is a leading scholar in Peruvian late modern history and the effects of religion and race in the Hispanic colonial world.[2]

Silverblatt was awarded a Rockefeller Foundation resident fellowship in 1992 a Guggenheim fellowship in 1993.[3][4]

Contents

PublicationsEdit

ArticlesEdit

  • "Stained Blood in the Old World and the New: New Christians and the Racial Categories of the Colonial-Modern World." Edited by AE Glauz-Todrank. Critical Research on Religion 2 (2014).
  • "Heresies and colonial geopolitics." Romanic Review 103, no. 1-2 (January 1, 2012): 65-80
  • "Confronting Nationalisms, Cosmopolitan Visions, and the Politics of Memory: Aesthetics of Reconciliation and Selma Meerbaum-Eisinger in Western Ukraine (Accepted)." Dissidences 4, no. 8 (2012).
  • "Chasteté et pureté des liens sociaux dans le Pérou du XVIIe siècle." Cahiers du Genre 50, no. 1 (December 1, 2011): 17-40.
  • "Colonial Peru and the Inquisition: Race-Thinking, Torture, and the Making of the Modern World." Transforming Anthropology 19, no. 2 (October 2011): 132-138.
  • "Colonial conspiracies." ETHNOHISTORY 53, no. 2 (2006): 259-280.

BooksEdit

  • “New Christians and New World Fears in Seventeenth-Century Peru“
  • Modern Inquisitions: Peru and the Colonial Origins of the Civilized World [5]
  • Moon, Sun, and Witches: Gender Ideologies and Class in Inca and Colonial Peru[6]

Edditing and translationEdit

  • [7]
  • Japanese and Spanish translation of Moon, Sun, and Witches[8][9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Silverblatt, Irene, “New Christians and New World Fears in Seventeenth-Century Peru“, in Comparative Studies in Society and History,Vol. 42, No. 3 (Jul., 2000), cover
  2. ^ "History Department." Irene Silverblatt | Duke University History Department. Accessed April 23, 2018. https://history.duke.edu/people/irene-silverblatt.
  3. ^ "Guggenheim Fellowship: Irene Silverblatt". gf.org. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  4. ^ "Irene Silverblatt". Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University. 2012-03-16. Retrieved 2018-04-24.
  5. ^ Silverblatt, I. Modern Inquisitions: Peru and the Colonial Origins of the Civilized World. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2004.
  6. ^ Silverblatt, I. Moon, Sun, and Witches: Gender Ideologies and Class in Inca and Colonial Peru. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1987.
  7. ^ Meerbaum-Eisinger, S. Harvest of Blossoms: Poems from a Life Cut Short (Collected Poems of Selma Meerbaum-Eisinger). Edited by I Silverblatt and H Silverblatt. Translated by J Glenn, F Birkmeyer, H Silverblatt, and I Silverblatt. Northwestern University Press, 2008
  8. ^ Silverblatt, I. Japanese translation of Moon, Sun, and Witches. Tokyo, Japan: Iwanami Shoten Publisher, 2001.
  9. ^ Silverblatt, I. Spanish translation of Moon, Sun, and Witches. Lima, Peru: Centro-Las Casas, 1990.