Illyrian Academy (1703)

The Illyrian Academy (Academia Illyrika iliti vam Slovinska) was an academy established in Split, Venetian Republic probably in 1703 or 1704. Its mission was to further the causes of the Counter-Reformation movement of the Catholic Church and to advance Slavic letters hoping to spread the use of Slavic (Slovinski) language.[1] The intention of members of this academy was to make their language more attractive and to deal with questions of the writing style.[1] They established the academy in Split because they considered language spoken in Split as the most accomplished Slavic language.[1] They were also concerned about liberation of the Slavic brothers from the Ottoman rule.[1]

Illyrian Academy
Academia Illyrika iliti vam Slovinska
Formationprobably in 1703 or 1704
FounderJohn Peter Marchi
Founded atSplit
Dissolved1731
Purpose
HeadquartersSplit

BackgroundEdit

The establishment of this academy corresponds with decline of the Ottoman Empire and introduction of the Slavic language into literature published for the Slavic speakers of the Balkans. The Illyrian Academy was one of many similar academies established in Dalmatia in the beginning of the 18th century to further the causes of the Counter-Reformation movement of the Catholic church and to advance Slavic letters hoping to spread the use of Slavic (Slovinski) language.[1]

EstablishmentEdit

The establishment of the academy was probably initiated by Ivan Paštrić.[2]

The Illyrian Academy was founded at the very beginning of the 18th century,[3] probably in 1703[4] or in 1704.[5] John Peter Marchi, a member of the Split nobility, was founder, president and member of the Illyrian Academy.[6][7] The archbishop of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Split-Makarska, Stephanus Cosimi, supported the establishment of the Illyrian Academy.[8] In his 1703 letter he informs Paštrić about the establishment of the academy.[9] Paštrić probably became a member of the Illyrian Academy.[10]

The purpose of the Illyrian Academy was to develop science and literature having academies in Italy as role model.[11] The Illyirian Academy published literature works using a language spoken by the people.[12]

In 1703 it had 19 members, including Catholic priest Franjo Kriton, Jerolim Kavanjin, Ivan Dražić and Petar Macukat.[13] The Saint protector of the academy was Saint Jerome.[13]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e Fine Jr. 2006, p. 440.
  2. ^ Morović & Anzulović 1988, p. 138.
  3. ^ Božić-Bužančić 1982, p. 124.
  4. ^ Matica 1998, p. 138.
  5. ^ straža 1935, p. 54.
  6. ^ hrvatska 1952, p. 318.
  7. ^ Ljubić 1869.
  8. ^ Kratofil 1999, p. 658.
  9. ^ Vjesnik 1967, p. 131.
  10. ^ Božić-Bužančić 1999, p. 183.
  11. ^ Morović 1971, p. 131.
  12. ^ Zavod 1960, p. 140.
  13. ^ a b HAZU 1999, p. 183.

SourcesEdit

Further readingEdit