Hortobágy labor camps

The forced labor camps of Hortobágy were established by the communist regime in the eastern parts of Hungary during the beginning of the 1950s.

Between 1950 and 1953 about ten thousand people were taken here without a legal verdict.[1] They had to work under armed supervision and in inhuman conditions on the state farms in Hortobágy, Nagykunság, and Hajdúság.[2] The laborers couldn't return to their homes even after the 1953 amnesty and weren’t eligible for compensation.[3]

The deportations beginning on June 23rd 1950 were the typical examples of the morbid fears of the communist regime. Thousands of families from the western and southern borders, which were claimed to be “unsafe” because of the Cold War by the government at the time (Dobi István, Rákosi Mátyas, Nagy Imre), were taken to the twelve labor camps on the Alföld. The deported had barely an hour to pack, their papers were taken, and their beds were about half a meter wide. Their forced labor took place on the state farms of nearby villages until the first Nagy Imre government declared amnesty in July 1953. The camps were closed in the fall of the same year. However, the aggrieved could not return to their homes and were only employed as unskilled laborers. As such, the real estates and wealth of the claimed seditionaries were confiscated by the state, by which it hoped to frighten the population. The victims haven’t been compensated since.[4]

CampsEdit

Camp name Years of existence
Árkus 1950–1953
Borsós 1952–1953
Borzas-Mihályfalva 1950–1953
Ebes 1951–1953
Elep 1951–1953
Erzsébet-tanya 1950–1953
Kócspuszta 1950–1953
Kónya 1950–1953
Kormópuszta 1950–1953
Lászlómajor 1952–1953
Lenintanya 1950–1953
Tedej 1951–1953

TodayEdit

Those forced laborers who were still alive in 2000 founded the Association of those Deported to the Labor Camps of Hortobágy (Hortobágyi Kényszermunkatáborokba Elhurcoltak Egyesülete). It has 915 members today.[5] A stone was erected to recognize those incarcerated.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ A kényszermunkatáborok áldozataira emlékeztek. Szent Korona Rádió, 2007. June 23. Accessed 2010. March 27.
  2. ^ Camps Archived August 22, 2009, at the Wayback Machine. Hortobágyi Kényszermunkatáborokba Elhurcoltak Egyesülete. Accessed 2010. March 27.
  3. ^ The history of the labor camps in Hortobágy. Archived August 27, 2009, at the Wayback Machine Hortobágyi Kényszermunkatáborokba Elhurcoltak Egyesülete. Accessed 2010. March 27.
  4. ^ "Hortobágy Forced Labour Camps 1950-1953 (Excerpt)". Magyarmegmaradasert.hu. Retrieved March 2, 2019.
  5. ^ Introduction Archived August 27, 2009, at the Wayback Machine. Hortobágyi Kényszermunkatáborokba Elhurcoltak Egyesülete. Accessed 2010. March 27.
  6. ^ [1][dead link]

Further readingEdit

  • Beke Ferencné (dr. Barton Attila és Jeney Attila szerk.): Három év Hortobágy poklában (Kráter Kiadó, Pomáz, 2002) ISBN 963-9472-09-3