Hippocrates of Athens

Hippocrates bust in the Museum of Athens

Hippocrates of Athens (Greek: Ἱπποκράτης, Hippokrátēs; c. 459 – 424 BC), the son of Ariphron, was a strategos of the Athenians in 424 BC, serving alongside Demosthenes.

In the summer of 424, Hippocrates and Demosthenes set out from Athens to seize the long walls of Megara (which connected the city with its port Nisaea). The Spartan garrison at Nisaea surrendered, but the Athenians were unable to capture Megara itself, and were compelled to withdraw when the Brasidas arrived to relieve the Megarans.[1] Hippocrates then commanded an Athenian force which invaded Boeotia. Hippocrates was given command of the land force that was to take Delium and he succeeded in doing so and fortifying a garrison there.[2] When Hippocrates learned that the Boeotian army was approaching, Hippocrates began to retreat to Athens; he was unable to do so, and fought an army commanded by Pagondas at the Battle of Delium. The Athenians were clearly defeated. Hippocrates died near the beginning of the battle and nearly a thousand Athenians were slain alongside him. Only nightfall prevented further losses. After a siege of seventeen days, Delium fell to the Boeotians and at that point the bodies of Hippocrates and the other men were returned to the Athenians.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Wylie, Graham (1993). "Demosthenes the General: Protagonist in a Greek Tragedy?". Greece & Rome. 40: 24.
  2. ^ Wylie, Graham (1993). "Demosthenes the General: Protagonist in a Greek Tragedy?". Greece & Rome. 40: 24–25.