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Hierocaesarea, from the Greek for "sacred" and the Latin for "Caesar's" was a town and bishopric in the late Roman province of Lydia, the metropolitan see of which was Sardis.

Contents

HistoryEdit

This town is mentioned by Ptolemy (VI, ii, 16). Judging from its coins, it worshipped the goddess Artemis Persica.

The site of Hieroaesarea must have been between the modern Turkish villages of Beyova and Sasova, seven or eight miles southeast of Thyatira, on the left bank of the Koum-Chai, a tributary of the Hermus, in the Ottoman vilayet of Smyrna.[1]

BishopricEdit

It is mentioned as an episcopal see in all the Notitiae Episcopatuum until the 12th or 13th century,.[2] but we know only three of its bishops:

The see remains a (vacant) titular see in the Roman Catholic Church, with nominal bishops appointed.[5]

  • Bishop Ernesto de Paula (1960.01.09 – 1994.12.31)
  • Bishop Timothy Phelim O’Shea, O.F.M. Cap. (1950.05.24 – 1959.04.25)
  • Bishop Franz Justus Rarkowski, S.M. (1938.01.07 – 1950.02.09)
  • Bishop John Marie Laval (1911.09.11 – 1937.06.04)
  • Bishop Giuseppe Astuni (1903.01.21 – 1911.02.21)
  • Bishop Alessandro Beniamino Zanecchia-Ginnetti, O.C.D. (1902.06.09 – 1902.06.18)
  • Bishop Désiré-François-Xavier Van Camelbeke, M.E.P. (1884.01.15 – 1901.11.09)
  • Bishop Luigi Bienna (1845.04.24 – 1882.07.02)
  • Bishop John Bede Polding, O.S.B. (later Archbishop) (1832.07.03 – 1842.04.05)[6]
  • Bishop-elect José Seguí, O.E.S.A. (later Archbishop) (1829.07.27 – 1830.07.05)
  • Bishop Antonio Maria Trigona (later Archbishop) (1806.03.31 – 1817.07.28)
  • Bishop Gregory Stapleton (1800.11.07 – 1802.05.23)
  • Bishop Charles Berington (1786.06.02 – 1798.06.08)
  • Bishop Santiago Hernández, O.P. (1757.08.13 – 1777.02.06)
  • Bishop Louis-Joseph de Châteauneuf de Rochebonne (1720.03.04 – 1722.03.01)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ www.newadvent.org .
  2. ^ Joseph Bingham, Origines Ecclesiasticae; Or the Antiquities of the Christian Church and Other Works: In Nine Volumes, Volume 3 (Straker, 1843)p105.
  3. ^ Richard Price, Michael Gaddis, The Acts of the Council of Chalcedon, Volume 1 p95 (Liverpool University Press, 2005) p95.
  4. ^ Michel Le Quien, Oriens christianus p891.
  5. ^ Titular Episcopal See of Hierocæsarea at GCatholic.org.
  6. ^ John Bede POLDING.

SourcesEdit

  •   Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Hierocæsarea". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.

  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton.