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Helen Dunmore FRSL (12 December 1952 – 5 June 2017[1]) was a British poet, novelist and children's writer.[2]

Helen Dunmore
A welcome guest.jpg
Dunmore in 2008
Born (1952-12-12)12 December 1952
Beverley, Yorkshire, England
Died 5 June 2017(2017-06-05) (aged 64)
Bristol, England
Occupation Poet, novelist, children's writer
Nationality British
Alma mater University of York
Notable awards
Spouse Francis Charnley (m. 1981)
Children Patrick
Tess
Ollie (stepson)

Contents

BiographyEdit

Dunmore was born in Beverley, Yorkshire, in 1952, the second of four children of Betty (née Smith) and Maurice Dunmore. She studied English at York University, and lived in Finland for two years (1973–75) and worked as a teacher. She lived after that in Bristol.[3][1] Dunmore was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature (FRSL). Some of Dunmore's children's books are included in reading schemes for use in schools.

In 2017, she published her last book, Birdcage Walk, before writing an article about mortality for The Guardian after she was diagnosed with terminal cancer.[4] She died on 5 June 2017.[1][5][6][7] Her poetry collection Inside the Wave was posthumously shortlisted for the 2017 Costa Book Awards.[8]

Personal lifeEdit

Her husband Frank Charnley, whom she married in 1980, is a lawyer.[9] Dunmore had a son, daughter and stepson, and three grandchildren at the time of her death.[1]

Awards and honoursEdit

BibliographyEdit

NovelsEdit

An "Exclusive edition for independent bookshops" (ISBN 978-1-78633-000-0) includes a 14-page essay "On Reading"[20]
  • Birdcage Walk (2017)

Short story collectionsEdit

  • Love of Fat Men (1997)
  • Ice Cream (2001)
  • Rose, 1944 (2005)

Young adult booksEdit

  • Zillah and Me!
    • The Lilac Tree (first published as Zillah and Me) (2004)
    • The Seal Cove (first published as The Zillah Rebellion) (2004)
    • The Silver Bead (2004)
  • The Ingo Chronicles

Children's booksEdit

  • Going to Egypt (1992)
  • In the Money (1995)
  • Go Fox (1996)
  • Fatal Error (1996)
  • Amina's Blanket (1996)
  • Allie's Apples (1997)
  • Clyde's Leopard (1998)
  • Great-Grandma's Dancing Dress (1998)
  • Brother Brother, Sister Sister (1999)
  • Allie's Rabbit (1999)
  • Allie's Away (2000)
  • Aliens Don't Eat Bacon Sandwiches (2000)
  • The Ugly Duckling (2001)
  • Tara's Tree House (2003)
  • The Ferry Birds (April 2010)
  • The Lonely Sea Dragon (April 2013)

Poetry collectionsEdit

  • The Apple Fall (Bloodaxe Books, 1983)
  • The Sea Skater (Bloodaxe Books, 1986)
  • The Raw Garden (Bloodaxe Books, 1988)
  • Short Days, Long Nights: New & Selected Poems (Bloodaxe Books, 1991)
  • Recovering a Body (Bloodaxe Books, 1994)
  • Secrets (The Bodley Head, 1994) [children's poetry title]
  • Bestiary (Bloodaxe Books, 1997)
  • Out of the Blue: Poems 1975-2001 (Bloodaxe Books, 2001)
  • Snollygoster and Other Poems (Scholastic Press, 2001) [children's poetry title]
  • Glad of these times (Bloodaxe Books, 2007)
  • The Malarkey (Bloodaxe Books, 2012)
  • Inside the Wave (Bloodaxe Books, 2017)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Kate Kellaway (5 June 2017). "Helen Dunmore obituary". The Guardian. Retrieved 9 June 2017. 
  2. ^ "Helen Dunmore - Literature". British Council Literature. Retrieved 6 June 2017. 
  3. ^ "News And Publicity | Bloodaxe Books". www.bloodaxebooks.com. Retrieved 5 June 2017. 
  4. ^ "Helen Dunmore: facing mortality and what we leave behind". The Guardian. 4 March 2017. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 5 June 2017. 
  5. ^ Cain, Sian (5 June 2017). "Poet and author Helen Dunmore dies aged 64". The Guardian. Retrieved 5 June 2017. 
  6. ^ "Helen Dunmore, poet and novelist, dies aged 64". BBC News. 6 June 2017. 
  7. ^ "Death of Novelist Helen Dunmore Announced". Foyles. 5 June 2017. 
  8. ^ "Combined shortlist 2017" (PDF). Costa Book Awards. Retrieved 22 November 2017. 
  9. ^ Marianne Macdonald (21 September 2003). "A writer's life: Helen Dunmore". Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 12 March 2017. 
  10. ^ "Past winners of the McKitterick Prize". Society of Authors. 
  11. ^ McCrum, Robert (10 June 2001). "The Siege is a novel for now". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 7 June 2009. 
  12. ^ Woodman, Sue (1 July 1996). "Orange is a female color". The Nation. Washington D.C. Retrieved 12 December 2011. (subscription required)
  13. ^ Dowson, Jane; Entwistle, Alice (2005). A History of Twentieth-Century British Women's Poetry. Cambridge University Press. p. xx. ISBN 978-0-521-81946-6. 
  14. ^ "Helen Dunmore – Orange Prize winner – Poetry". Archived from the original on 28 March 2015. 
  15. ^ "The Man Booker Prize 2010". Retrieved 5 June 2017. 
  16. ^ "Helen Dunmore Bloodaxe author page". Retrieved 7 June 2017. 
  17. ^ "Helen Dunmore". British Council. Retrieved 11 October 2015. 
  18. ^ "2015 Shortlist announced". Walter Scott Prize. 24 March 2015. Retrieved 24 March 2015. 
  19. ^ Elaine Showalter, "Dreams of a dead daughter", 27 September 2003, The Guardian. Retrieved 5 June 2017.
  20. ^ Dunmore, Helen (2016). "On Reading: an exclusive for independent bookshops". Exposure. Hutchnson. pp. 395–410. ISBN 978-1-78633-000-0.  Title page of essay on p 395, text of essay on pp 397-410. Dustjacket bears the words "Exclusive edition for independent bookshops"

External linksEdit