Harvey L. Slatin

Harvey L. Slatin was an American physicist and inventor.[1] He was the 23rd scientist recruited to work on the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos, New Mexico in 1942. He worked on the isolation of plutonium. He was the last surviving member of his Special Engineering Detachment (SED) relating to the Manhattan Project.[2]

Harvey L. Slatin
Born(1915-06-17)June 17, 1915
DiedFebruary 23, 2013(2013-02-23) (aged 97)
CitizenshipUnited States
Alma materCornell University
Spouse(s)Yeffe Kimball (1948–1978); Anne Pratt Slatin (1979-Death)
ChildrenThomas Wilson Pratt Slatin
Scientific career
Doctoral advisorRobert J. Oppenheimer

In his work as an inventor, he held various patents relating to electroplating processes, such as the process for the electrolytic production of metals, for the preparation of pure metals from their compounds.[3] One of his patents includes a patent for a method of producing lithium.[4] He is the inventor on a patent relating to electrolysis of rare-earth elements and Yttrium.[5]

Slatin received a full scholarship to Cornell University. He graduated in 1937 with a degree in chemical engineering. He earned his PhD at the University of California at Berkeley in nuclear physics. His faculty adviser was Robert J. Oppenheimer. A top security clearance was required to read his doctoral dissertation.

Slatin was married to Yeffe Kimball in his first marriage. He and Yeffe Kimble worked on a photography project in the 1950s to honor Native Americans in the Southwest region of the United States. Some of the photographs can be found in the Indian Museum in Santé Fe, New Mexico.[6] She predeceased him in 1978. He then married Anne Katherine Pratt. They had one son, Thomas Wilson Pratt Slatin, a photographer and writer, who specializes in urban exploration photography. Slatin was a supporter of Friends of Music, located in Stamford, New York. He was a longtime vice-president of the organization and served on the board of directors.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Harvey L. Slatin". Atomic Heritage Foundation. Retrieved 4 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "Harvey L. Slatin". Atomic Heritage Foundation. Retrieved 4 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "Preparation of pure metals from their compounds". 24 October 1951. Retrieved 4 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Method of producing lithium". 26 September 1967. Retrieved 4 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ "Electrolysis of rare-earth elements and yttrium". 18 September 1957. Retrieved 4 July 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ [1]