Halite (oxyanion)

A halite, also known as a halogenite,[1] is an oxyanion containing a halogen in a III oxidation state. It is the conjugate base of a halous acid. The known halites are chlorite, bromite, and iodite.

Chlorite (ClO2), a halite

UsesEdit

Halites can be used to generate the respective halogen dioxides via a one-electron oxidation:

5 NaClO2 + 4 HCl5 NaCl + ClO
2
+ 2 H2O
BrO
2
+ HBrO3 + H+BrO
2
+ H2O

This reaction in particular is used in bleach to generate chlorine dioxide.

StabilityEdit

Chlorites tend to decompose rapidly, some even explosively, upon heating.[2] A few bromites have been isolated, but no iodites have.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Holleman, A. F.; Wiberg, Egon; Wiberg, Nils (2001). Inorganic Chemistry. Web: Academic Press. p. 439. ISBN 9780123526519. Retrieved 21 March 2019.
  2. ^ Holleman, A. F.; Wiberg, Egon; Wiberg, Nils (2001). Inorganic Chemistry. Web: Academic Press. p. 445. ISBN 9780123526519. Retrieved 21 March 2019.
  3. ^ Egon Wiberg, Arnold Frederick Holleman (2001) Inorganic Chemistry, Elsevier ISBN 0-12-352651-5