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The Great Synagogue (Polish: Wielka Synagoga w Białymstoku) was a synagogue located in Białystok, Poland, which was built between 1909-1913 and designed by Szlojme Rabinowicz. The synagogue was burnt down by Germans on June 27, 1941, with an estimated number of 2,000 Jews inside.

Great Synagogue of Białystok
Synagoga Nomer Tamid 02.jpg
The Great Synagogue and Nomer Tamid
Religion
AffiliationOrthodox Judaism
StatusDestroyed in 1941
Location
LocationSuraska Street,
Białystok, Poland
Architecture
Architect(s)Szlojme Rabinowicz
Groundbreaking1909
Completed1913
Dome(s)3

Contents

HistoryEdit

The synagogue was located on Suraska Street. Construction began in 1909 and the building was completed in 1913. It was designed by Szlojme (Shlomo) Jakow Rabinowicz. The design included three Byzantine style domes: a large one with a ten-meter spire over the main hall with two smaller ones flanking it over the side halls.[1]

On the morning of June 27, 1941, Nazi troops from Police Battalion 309 of the Ordnungspolizei surrounded the town square by the Great Synagogue, and forced residents from their homes into the street. Some were shoved up against building walls and shot dead. Others– some 2,000 men, women and children– were locked in the synagogue, which was subsequently set on fire; there they burned to death. The Nazi onslaught continued with the grenading of numerous homes and further shootings. As the flames from the synagogue spread and merged with the grenade fires, the entire square was engulfed. On that day some 3,000 Jews lost their lives. [2] (Archive from Geocities)

MonumentEdit

 
The Memorial

A reconstruction of the destroyed dome and a memorial plaque were dedicated in August 1995. The plaque reads: "Our splendid sanctuary fell victim to the flames on June 27, 1941. 2000 Jews were burnt alive in it by the German Nazi murderers."

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Bartman, Tilford. "The Bialystok Great Synagogue". Zabludow Memorial Website. Archived from the original on 30 May 2013. Retrieved 6 May 2014.
  2. ^ Raiha, Evelyn. The Holocaust

External linksEdit