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Goliath (Six Flags Magic Mountain)

Goliath is a steel roller coaster located at Six Flags Magic Mountain amusement park in Valencia, California. Manufactured by Giovanola of Switzerland, the hypercoaster is located in the Goliath Plaza section of the park and opened to the public on February 11, 2000. Its sub-tropical theme is characterized by ancient ruins of the Mayan civilization. The ride is nearly identical to Titan at Six Flags Over Texas, but it lacks a 540-degree upward helix prior to the mid-course brake run and features a slightly shorter track layout.

Goliath
Goliath at Six Flags Magic Mountain (first drop).jpg
Goliath's first drop
Six Flags Magic Mountain
Park sectionGoliath Plaza
Coordinates34°25′37″N 118°35′49″W / 34.42694°N 118.59694°W / 34.42694; -118.59694Coordinates: 34°25′37″N 118°35′49″W / 34.42694°N 118.59694°W / 34.42694; -118.59694
StatusOperating
Opening dateFebruary 11, 2000 (2000-02-11)
Cost$30 million
General statistics
TypeSteel
ManufacturerGiovanola
DesignerWerner Stengel
ModelMega Coaster
Lift/launch systemChain lift hill
Height235 ft (72 m)
Drop255 ft (78 m)
Length4,500 ft (1,400 m)
Speed85 mph (137 km/h)
Inversions0
Duration3:00
Max vertical angle61°
Capacity1600 riders per hour
Height restriction48 in (122 cm)
Trains3 trains with 5 cars. Riders are arranged 2 across in 3 rows for a total of 30 riders per train.
WebsiteOfficial website
Flash Pass available
Must transfer from wheelchair
Goliath at RCDB
Pictures of Goliath at RCDB

For a brief period, Goliath was widely recognized for having the longest drop at 255 feet (78 m) and the fastest speed of 85 mph (137 km/h) among all closed-circuit roller coasters in the world. Millennium Force at Cedar Point eclipsed both records several months later when it debuted on May 13, 2000, with a drop of 300 feet (91 m) and a maximum speed of 93 mph (150 km/h).

Contents

Ride experienceEdit

Leaving the station, the train makes a nearly 180 degree right turn. The train then ascends the lift hill, reaching a height of 235 ft (72 m). Ascent slows toward the top of the hill, a safety feature that reduces stress on the chain; it is also an attempt to reduce positive g-forces and increases rider anticipation. The train begins accelerating down the initial 255 ft (78 m) drop, into an underground tunnel, reaching a speed of 85 miles per hour (137 km/h). Upon exiting the tunnel, the train heads upwards into a banked right turn that towers above Twisted Colossus. After completing the turn, the train heads down another drop, flattening out to pass by the onride camera. An airtime hill and banked left turn (rather than a helix on "Titan") follows into the mid-course brake run. The train is decelerated quickly and makes a hard left turn out of the brake section. Another 180 degree banked turn directs the train into a 585 degree, descending helix. Then, the track turns upwards and banks left. After an ascending right turn, the train reaches the final brake run.


PhotosEdit

Video of the Ride
 
A view of the Ride
 
Goliath from the Whistlestop Park section.

OperationEdit

  • 120-foot (37 m) long tunnel at the bottom of the first drop.
  • Ride capacity: 1,600 passengers per hour.
  • Three five-car 30-passenger trains, with two abreast seating.
  • A small error was made while the ride's parts were being manufactured by Giovanola. The very last track piece before the final brake run was about 6 inches (150 mm) too short. The mistake was found while the final piece was being bolted to the ride, and a supplementary track piece had to be made to fill the 6-inch (150 mm) gap.[citation needed]
  • Appeared as “The Scream Monster” in Judy Moody and the Not Bummer Summer.
  • Appeared as “Aquaman: The Ride” in Entourage (Season 3 Episode 3 "Dominated").
  • Appeared in the Zoey 101 episode "Roller Coaster".
  • Appeared in James Corden's Carpool Karaoke video with Selena Gomez

AwardsEdit

Golden Ticket Awards: Top steel Roller Coasters
Year 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2019
Ranking 18[1] 14[2] 14[3] 18[4] 18[5] 20[6] 24[7] [8] 30[9] 33[10] 29[11] 40 (tie)[12] 41[13] 41[14] 49 (tie)[15]

IncidentsEdit

On June 2, 2001, a 28-year-old woman died from a heart attack while riding Goliath. The park closed the ride for several hours and reopened it the same day after it passed inspection.[16]

On April 4, 2015, one of Goliath's trains got stuck on the lift hill during a test run due to a chain malfunction which needed an entire chain replacement. The train was eventually brought down and the ride remained closed until the lift hill was fixed. However, Giovanola, the company that designed Goliath, went bankrupt, so the chain had to be ordered from a different company. The ride eventually reopened on July 18, 2015.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Top 25 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. August 2000. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  2. ^ "Top 25 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 7B. August 2001. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  3. ^ "Top 25 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 7B. September 2002. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  4. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 14–15B. September 2003. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  5. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 18–19B. September 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 3, 2007. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  6. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 26–27B. September 2005. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  7. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today: 26–27B. September 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  8. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 11 (6.2): 36–37. September 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  9. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 12 (6.2): 36–37. September 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  10. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 13 (6.2): 32–33. September 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  11. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 14 (6.2): 34–35. September 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  12. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 15 (6.2): 38–39. September 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  13. ^ "Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 16 (6.2): 36–37. September 2012. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  14. ^ "2013 Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 17 (6.2): 34–35. September 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 19, 2013. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  15. ^ "2019 Top 50 steel Roller Coasters" (PDF). Amusement Today. 23 (6.2): 53. September 2019. Retrieved September 11, 2019.
  16. ^ "Woman Dies After Roller Coaster Ride". Los Angeles Times. June 3, 2001. Retrieved July 11, 2019.

External linksEdit

Preceded by
Fujiyama
World's fastest complete circuit roller coaster
February 2000 – May 2000
Succeeded by
Millennium Force