Glen Clark ministry

The Glen Clark ministry was the combined Cabinet (formally the Executive Council of British Columbia) that governed British Columbia from February 22, 1996 to August 25, 1999. It was led by Glen Clark, the 31st premier of British Columbia, and consisted of members of the New Democratic Party (NDP).

Glen Clark ministry
Flag of British Columbia.svg
31st ministry of British Columbia
Glen Clark 2011 NDP convention.jpg
Glen Clark in 2011
Date formedFebruary 22, 1996 (1996-02-22)
Date dissolvedAugust 25, 1999 (1999-08-25)
People and organisations
MonarchElizabeth II
Lieutenant GovernorGarde Gardom
PremierGlen Clark
Deputy PremierDan Miller
Member partyNew Democratic Party
Status in legislatureMajority
Opposition partyLiberal Party
Opposition leaderGordon Campbell
History
Election(s)1996
Legislature term(s)
PredecessorHarcourt ministry
SuccessorMiller ministry

The Glen Clark ministry was established in the final months of the 35th Parliament of British Columbia, after Mike Harcourt stepped down as leader and Clark was elected as his successor. Following the 1996 British Columbia general election, it continued to govern through the first three years of the 36th Parliament of British Columbia, until Clark stepped down in 1999. It was succeeded by the Miller ministry.[1]

List of ministersEdit

Glen Clark ministry by portfolio
Portfolio Minister Tenure
Start End
Premier of British Columbia Glen Clark February 22, 1996 August 25, 1999
Deputy Premier of British Columbia Dan Miller February 28, 1996 August 25, 1999
Minister of Aboriginal Affairs John Cashore February 28, 1996 February 18, 1998
Dale Lovick February 18, 1998 January 29, 1999
Gordon Wilson January 29, 1999 July 21, 1999
Dale Lovick July 21, 1999 August 25, 1999
Minister of Advanced Education, Training and Technology Andrew Petter February 18, 1998 August 25, 1999
Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food David Zirnhelt February 28, 1996 June 17, 1996
Corky Evans June 17, 1996 February 18, 1998
Minister of Agriculture and Food Corky Evans February 18, 1998 August 25, 1999
Attorney General Ujjal Dosanjh February 28, 1996 August 25, 1999
Minister responsible for British Columbia Ferry Corporation Gordon Wilson January 29, 1999 August 25, 1999
Minister of Children and Families Penny Priddy September 23, 1996 February 18, 1998
Lois Boone February 18, 1998 August 25, 1999
Minister of Community Development, Co-operatives and Volunteers Jan Pullinger July 21, 1999 August 25, 1999
Minister of Education[a] Paul Ramsey February 28, 1996 June 17, 1996
Moe Sihota June 17, 1996 December 12, 1996
Joy MacPhail December 12, 1996 January 6, 1997
Paul Ramsey January 6, 1997 August 25, 1999
Minister of Employment and Investment Dan Miller February 28, 1996 February 18, 1998
Mike Farnworth February 18, 1998 August 25, 1999
Minister of Energy and Mines Dan Miller February 18, 1998 August 25, 1999
Minister of Environment, Land and Parks Moe Sihota February 28, 1996 June 17, 1996
Paul Ramsey June 17, 1996 January 6, 1997
Cathy McGregor January 6, 1997 July 21, 1999
Joan Sawicki July 21, 1999 August 25, 1999
Minister of Finance and Corporate Relations Elizabeth Cull February 28, 1996 June 17, 1996
Andrew Petter June 17, 1996 February 18, 1998
Joy MacPhail February 18, 1998 July 16, 1999
Gordon Wilson July 16, 1999 August 25, 1999
Minister of Fisheries Dennis Streifel February 18, 1998 August 25, 1999
Minister of Forests Dennis Streifel February 28, 1996 June 17, 1996
David Zirnhelt June 17, 1996 August 25, 1999
Minister of Health Andrew Petter February 28, 1996 June 17, 1996
Joy MacPhail June 17, 1996 February 18, 1998
Penny Priddy February 18, 1998 August 25, 1999
Minister responsible for Housing Mike Farnworth February 18, 1998 July 21, 1999
Minister of Human Resources Dennis Streifel September 23, 1996 February 18, 1998
Jan Pullinger February 18, 1998 July 21, 1999
Minister responsible for ICBC Dale Lovick January 29, 1999 August 25, 1999
Minister of Intergovernmental Relations[b] Andrew Petter February 28, 1996 August 25, 1999
Minister of Labour Penny Priddy February 28, 1996 June 17, 1996
Moe Sihota June 17, 1996 December 12, 1996
Joy MacPhail December 12, 1996 January 6, 1997
John Cashore January 6, 1997 February 18, 1998
Dale Lovick February 18, 1998 July 21, 1999
Joan Smallwood July 21, 1999 August 25, 1999
Minister responsible for Multiculturalism, Human Rights and Immigration Ujjal Dosanjh February 28, 1996 August 25, 1999
Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing Lois Boone February 28, 1996 June 17, 1996
Dan Miller June 17, 1996 January 6, 1997
Mike Farnworth January 6, 1997 February 18, 1998
Minister of Municipal Affairs Jenny Kwan February 18, 1998 July 21, 1999
Jim Doyle July 21, 1999 August 25, 1999
Minister responsible for Northern Development Dan Miller February 18, 1998 August 25, 1999
Minister responsible for Public Service Moe Sihota October 20, 1998 July 21, 1999
Helmut Giesbrecht July 21, 1999 August 25, 1999
Minister responsible for Seniors Andrew Petter February 28, 1996 June 17, 1996
Joy MacPhail June 17, 1996 February 18, 1998
Penny Priddy February 18, 1998 August 25, 1999
Minister of Small Business, Tourism and Culture Bill Barlee February 28, 1996 June 17, 1996
Penny Priddy June 17, 1996 September 23, 1996
Dan Miller June 26, 1996 September 3, 1996 (acting)
Jan Pullinger September 23, 1996 February 18, 1998
Ian Waddell February 18, 1998 August 25, 1999
Minister of Social Development and Economic Security Moe Sihota July 21, 1999 August 25, 1999
Minister of Social Services Joy MacPhail February 28, 1996 June 17, 1996
Dennis Streifel June 17, 1996 September 23, 1996
Minister of Transportation and Highways Corky Evans February 28, 1996 June 17, 1996
Lois Boone June 17, 1996 February 18, 1998
Harry Lali February 18, 1998 August 25, 1999
Minister responsible for Volunteers and Community Services Sector Jan Pullinger March 21, 1998 July 21, 1999
Minister of Women's Equality Sue Hammell February 28, 1996 July 19, 1999
Jenny Kwan July 21, 1999 August 25, 1999
Minister responsible for Youth Glen Clark February 28, 1996 August 25, 1999

Cabinet composition and shufflesEdit

Clark's initial cabinet consisted of 15 members, down from 18 in the Harcourt ministry. Clark reduced the number of portfolios by three: the ministries of government services and housing were eliminated, and the energy, mines and petroleum portfolio was merged with employment and investment. Additionally, the ministry of skills, training and labour was split, with the responsibility for skills and labour moved under the ministry of education.[2] Clark made only modest changes to the cabinet: of the so-called "gang of six" that, along with Clark, had shaped much of Harcourt's agenda, three kept their portfolios — Moe Sihota (environment), Elizabeth Cull (finance), Joy MacPhail (social services) — and two earned promotions: Dan Miller moved to the enlarged ministry of employment and investment and was named deputy premier, and Andrew Petter moved to health.[3] Additionally, four other ministers held onto their portfolios: John Cashore (aboriginal affairs), David Zirnhelt (agriculture), Ujjal Dosanjh (attorney general) and Bill Barlee (small business and tourism). Five ministers were dropped, as they had decided against running for re-election: Art Charbonneau, Anne Edwards, Darlene Marzari, Jackie Pement and Harcourt himself. Three new ministers were added: Lois Boone, who had briefly served in the Harcourt ministry; Corky Evans, second-place finisher in the 1996 leadership election; and Dennis Streifel.[4]

Following the 1996 election, Clark shuffled his cabinet. The number of ministers was reduced further, to 13, which Clark said was the smallest in "40 or 50 years". Cull and Barlee were dropped from cabinet due to losing re-election, and Clark decided to give more responsibilities to the remaining ministers rather than elevate backbenchers, believing that it would "bring some real focus to government". He admitted, however, that the ministers couldn't be expected to carry the larger workload forever, and anticipated expanding the cabinet by three or four ministers in about a year's time.[5] With Petter taking over finance, Sihota taking both labour and education, MacPhail taking health and Miller gaining municipal affairs and housing, journalists Jeff Lee and Vaughn Palmer, both of the Vancouver Sun, noted that the "gang of five" increased their presence in the government.[6][7]

On June 26, 1996, Penny Pridy took leave from cabinet in order to deal with her breast cancer treatment. Dan Miller was named acting minister of small business, tourism and culture during her recovery.[8] She returned to cabinet in September.

On September 23, 1996, Clark announced the establishment of a new ministry of children and families, splitting off the responsibility from the ministry of human resources. Priddy was named the inaugural minister of children and families, and Dennis Steifel remained minister of the renamed ministry of human resources, now only responsible for managing income assistance. Backbencher Jan Pullinger was named to Priddy's old role as minister of small business, tourism and culture.[9]

On December 12, 1996, Sihota stepped down from cabinet due to two separate conflict of interest investigations. MacPhail took over his portfolios in an acting capacity.[10] On January 6, 1997, Clark made a mini-shuffle to fill the gap. Paul Ramsey and John Cashore took Sihota's roles as minister of education and minister of labour, respectively, with Cashore also keeping his role as minister of aboriginal affairs. Two new ministers joined cabinet: Cathy McGregor, who took over Ramsey's newly-vacated environment portfolio; and Mike Farnworth, who became minister of municipal affairs and housing, taking it out of Miller's jurisdiction.[11] The shuffle drew criticism from the Mayor of Victoria, Bob Cross, as it reduced Victoria's presence in cabinet to one (Andrew Petter); by comparison, under Harcourt, the city had four ministers. Clark, however, said regional considerations were behind the appointments, as McGregor became the second member of cabinet from the Interior region.[12]

Clark made his first major cabinet shuffle on February 18, 1998. All but four ministers — Dosanjh, Ramsey, Zirnhelt and Evans — were either moved to a new portfolio or had their existing one reconfigured. Two new ministries, advanced education and fisheries, were created. MacPhail was named the new finance minister, replacing Petter. The size of cabinet expanded to 19 with the addition of four new ministers: Jenny Kwan, Harry Lali, Dale Lovick and Ian Waddell.[13] Lovick's appointment made him the third minister from Vancouver Island; as he represented the riding of Nanaimo and Pullinger represented Cowichan-Ladysmith, the Victoria-based paper the Times Colonist suggested that the "Vancouver Island power base moved to the mid-island".[14] The new cabinet made two firsts in B.C. political history: Jenny Kwan became the first Chinese-Canadian cabinet minister,[15] and Lovick and Pullinger became the first married couple to be in cabinet together.[16]

On October 20, 1998, Sihota returned to cabinet. He was named minister responsible for the Public Service, a new role that Clark said would co-ordinate all government activities and initiatives aimed at boosting the province's economy.[17]

On January 29, 1999, Gordon Wilson, leader of the Progressive Democratic Alliance and former leader of the Liberal Party, crossed the floor to join the NDP. He was appointed to cabinet as minister responsible for the B.C. Ferry Corporation and as minister of aboriginal affairs. Dan Miller, previously responsible for the B.C. Ferry Corp., remained deputy premier and minister of energy; Lovick, previously minister of aboriginal affairs, remained minister of labour, and additionally gained responsibility for the Insurance Corporation of British Columbia.[18]

On July 16, 1999, finance minister Joy MacPhail resigned from cabinet, citing "personal reasons … not family reasons". Reporter Judith Lavoie suggested it "mark[ed] the first major, public crack in the solidarity of the beleaguered NDP government." Wilson was appointed finance minister to replace her.[19] Five days later, on July 22, Clark announced a major shuffle of his cabinet. Two new ministries were created: the ministry of social development and economic security, headed by Sihota; and the ministry of community development co-operatives and volunteers, headed by Pullinger. Four new ministers — Jim Doyle, Helmut Giesbrecht, Joan Sawicki and Joan Smallwood — joined cabinet, and one, Cathy McGregor was removed.[20] The shuffle was widely perceived as an attempt by Clark to shore up support: Judith Lavoie of the Times Colonist suggested that Clark's renewed attention on environment and poverty was an appeal to the party's left-wing base,[20] while Michael Smythe of The Province characterized the shuffle as "silenc[ing] dissdent, reward[ing] loyalists".[21]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ "Education, Skills and Training" from February 22, 1996 to February 18, 1998
  2. ^ "Minister responsible for Intergovernmental Relations" from February 28, 1996 to February 18, 1998

ReferencesEdit

CitationsEdit

  1. ^ "Glen Clark | The Canadian Encyclopedia". www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca. Retrieved August 6, 2022.
  2. ^ Hauka, Don; McLintock, Barbara (February 28, 1996). "Ministries to be chopped". The Province. pp. A9.
  3. ^ Leyne, Les (February 29, 1996). "Clark sticks with experience in pre-election tuneup of cabinet". Times Colonist. pp. A1–6.
  4. ^ McLintock, Barbara; Hauka, Don; Austin, Ian (February 29, 1996). "Enemies identified". The Province. pp. A6.
  5. ^ McLintock, Barbara; Hauka, Don (June 18, 1996). "Tried and true". The Province. pp. A4.
  6. ^ Lee, Jeff (June 18, 1996). "Clark awards top jobs to former confidantes in so-called Gang of Five". Vancouver Sun. pp. A4.
  7. ^ Palmer, Vaughn (June 18, 1996). "Cabinet duties are changing so fast only the premier can keep up". Vancouver Sun. pp. A12.
  8. ^ Leyne, Les (June 27, 1996). "Priddy takes short break". Times Colonist. pp. A6.
  9. ^ Leyne, Les (September 24, 1996). "Priddy takes short break". Times Colonist. pp. A1–A2.
  10. ^ McLintock, Barbara; Hauka, Don (December 13, 1996). "Moe goes". The Province. pp. A1.
  11. ^ Hauka, Don; Fraser, Keith (January 7, 1997). "Rookies' rough ride". The Province. pp. A6.
  12. ^ Meissner, Dirk (January 7, 1997). "Victoria given NDP shuffle". Times Colonist. pp. A1–A2.
  13. ^ Meissner, Dirk (February 19, 1998). "MacPhail handed Finance reins". Times Colonist. pp. A1–A2. John Cashore left cabinet, after he had earlier decided against running for re-election.
  14. ^ "Island lands third minister". Times Colonist. February 19, 1998. pp. A2.
  15. ^ Hauka, Don; McLinktock, Barbara (January 7, 1997). "Clark adds four ministers". The Province. pp. A4.
  16. ^ Lavoie, Judith (February 19, 1998). "Cabinet couple seeks individual identities". Times Colonist. pp. A1.
  17. ^ Austin, Ian (August 21, 1998). "Are you ready for Moe?". The Province. pp. A1, A3.
  18. ^ "Now that's a switch". Times Colonist. January 30, 1999. pp. A1, A3.
  19. ^ "MacPhail resigns as finance minister, Wilson takes reins". Times Colonist. July 17, 1999. pp. A1, A3.
  20. ^ a b Lavoie, Judith (July 22, 1999). "Clark ousts rebel, returns to roots in cabinet shuffle". Times Colonist. pp. A1–A2.
  21. ^ Smyth, Michael (July 22, 1999). "Last-ditch shuffle". The Province. pp. A6.

SourcesEdit

"Glen Clark Cabinet" (PDF). Legislative Library of British Columbia. Retrieved August 5, 2022.