Glasul Patriei

Glasul Patriei (Romanian for 'The Voice of the Fatherland') was a Communist Romania's propaganda publication aimed at Romanian emigres, that served the aim of promoting the Socialist Republic of Romania as a harbour not only of socialist ideas, but also as a natural continuation of Romanian nationalist and Orthodox traditions. Romanians with nationalist, Orthodox Christian or far-right credentials (such as people who once had been close to the fascist Iron Guard) were picked as the authors.[1]

The journal legitimized the regime by associating with members of the former elite and supported the view that former opponents of socialism were not being discriminated against.[2]

The journal portrayed the everyday reality of Romania positively, extolled how culture was now supposedly easy to access and re-interpreted symbolic figures of Romanian nation in a way that fit the regime. Thus, Nichifor Crainic portrayed the proto-fascist Octavian Goga as a peasant poet bemoaning the suffering peasants' hardship under the landlords' rule.[3]

Radu Gyr was also a notable collaborator with Glasul Patriei.[citation needed]

Founded in 1955, Glasul Patriei appeared until 1972. It was then replaced by Tribuna României, which ran until the Romanian Revolution.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Ionuţ Florin Biliuţă, “Between Orthodoxy and the Nation. Traditionalist Definitions of Romanianness in Interwar Romania” (M.A. Diss., Central European University-History Department, Budapest, 2007). P. 118.
  2. ^ Ionuţ Florin Biliuţă, “Between Orthodoxy and the Nation. Traditionalist Definitions of Romanianness in Interwar Romania” (M.A. Diss., Central European University-History Department, Budapest, 2007). P. 119.
  3. ^ Ionuţ Florin Biliuţă, “Between Orthodoxy and the Nation. Traditionalist Definitions of Romanianness in Interwar Romania” (M.A. Diss., Central European University-History Department, Budapest, 2007). P. 121.
  4. ^ (in Romanian) William Totok, „Glasul Patriei‟, Radio Free Europe Moldova, January 9, 2013