Giovanni Battista Cimaroli

The Running of the Bulls in Plaza San Marco. Venice

Giovanni Battista Cimaroli (1687–1771) was an Italian painter of rustic landscapes with farms, villas and graceful figures and capricci of ruins and views of towns in the Veneto.[1]

BiographyEdit

He was born in Salò on Lake Garda, not far from Brescia. He studied under Antonio Aureggio and later in Bologna with the landscape painter Antonio Calza,[2] before moving to Venice around 1713.[3] Cimaroli's rustic landscapes are reminiscent of the Arcadian scenes of Francesco Zuccarelli,[4] influenced by a tradition of Lombardian realism.[5]

Cimaroli collaborated c. 1722–6, with Canaletto (amongst other Venetian painters) on Owen McSwiney's unusual Allegorical Tombs series, whose aim was to memorialize British worthies, the main sponsor being the 2nd Duke of Richmond.[6][7] Caneletto's vedute became the inspiration for Cimaroli's own topographical views of Venice, which until recently have often been concealed under misattributions to Canaletto.[3]

 
River landscape with shepherds and flock

Important early patrons of Cimaroli were Marshal Schulenberg, Count Tessin of Sweden, and the British merchant and diplomat settled in Venice, Joseph (Consul) Smith.[8] It was through the disposition of Consul Smith's art collection, hand-picked by Smith for King George III,[9] that six landscapes by Cimaroli entered the Royal Collection, of which three oval views survive.[10] Giovanni Cimaroli, despite the esteem of contemporaries, was nearly forgotten until the mid-twentieth century,[9] but has undergone a revival of critical interest, typified by the publication of the first catalogue raisonné of his paintings.[3]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ "Giovanni Battista Cimaroli". Richard Green. Archived from the original on 6 October 2016. Retrieved 24 February 2016.
  2. ^ Pellegrino, Antonio Orlandi; Pietro Guarienti (1753). Abecedario Pittorico del m.r.p. Giambatista Pasquali, Venice. p. 272.
  3. ^ a b c Spadotto, Federica (2011). Giovan Battista Cimaroli, catalogo ragionato dei dipinti. Catalogue raisonné. Preface by Lionello Puppi. Rovigo: Minelliana. p. 315.
  4. ^ Spadotto, Federica (2007). Francesco Zuccarelli. Catalogue raisonné. Preface by Filippo Pedrocco. Milan: Bruno Alfieri. p. 400.
  5. ^ Spadotto, Federica (2009). 'Zuccarelli tra emuli, imitatori e copisti', p. 324–7. In L'impegno e la conoscenza: studi di storia dell'arte in onore di Egido Martina. Pedrocco, Filippo and Alberto Craievich, eds. Verona: Scripta edizioni.
  6. ^ Haskell, Francis (1980). Patrons and Painters: A Study of the Relations between Italian Art and Society in the Age of the Baroque. Revised and Enlarged edition. Yale University Press. New Haven and London. Haskell lists Canaletto and Piazetta as collaborators with Cimaroli in the painting commemorating Lord Somers; Balestra and Domenico and Giuseppe Valeriana for William III; Canaletto and Pittoni for Archbishop Tillotson; Paltronieri (il Mirandolese) and Pittoni for Lord Dorset.
  7. ^ Spadotto, Federica (2011). Spadotto clarifies Haskell to include D. Valeriani and an unknown Bolognese artist as collaborators with Cimaroli in regards to the painting of Lord Stanhope.
  8. ^ Haskell, Francis (1980).
  9. ^ a b Watson, F.J.B. (June 1953). "G.B. Cimaroli: A collaborator with Canaletto". The Burlington Magazine. XCV.
  10. ^ Levey, Michael (1964). The Later Italian Pictures in the Collection of Her Majesty the Queen. London: The Phaidon Press.

ReferencesEdit

  • Pellegrino, Antonio Orlandi; Pietro Guarienti (1753). Abecedario Pittorico del m.r.p. Giambatista Pasquali, Venice. p. 272.
  • Levey, Michael (1964). The Later Italian Pictures in the Collection of Her Majesty the Queen. London: The Phaidon Press.
  • Haskell, Francis (1980). Patrons and Painters: A Study of the Relations between Italian Art and Society in the Age of the Baroque. Revised and Enlarged edition. Yale University Press. New Haven and London.
  • Spadotto, Federica (2007). Francesco Zuccarelli. Catalogue raisonné. Preface by Filippo Pedrocco. Milan: Bruno Alfieri. p. 400.
  • Spadotto, Federica (2009). "Zuccarelli tra emuli, imitatori e copisti", p. 324–7. In L'impegno e la conoscenza: studi di storia dell'arte in onore di Egido Martina. Pedrocco, Filippo and Alberto Craievich, eds. Verona: Scripta edizioni.
  • Spadotto, Federica (2011). Giovan Battista Cimaroli, catalogo ragionato dei dipinti. Catalogue raisonné. Preface by Lionello Puppi. Rovigo: Minelliana. p. 315.

External linksEdit