Gertrude Walker

Gertrude Walker was an American screenwriter, TV writer, and novelist known for her work on B movies at Republic Pictures.

Gertrude Walker
Born
Gertrude Winifred Walker

April 8, 1902
Ohio, USA
DiedJune 18, 1995 (aged 93)
California, USA
EducationOhio State University
OccupationScreenwriter, actress, novelist
Spouse(s)Charles Winninger

BiographyEdit

Gertrude—the only child of Clinton "Razz" Walker and Gertrude White—grew up in Dayton, Ohio, and attended the Longfellow School. She graduated from Ohio State University, where she performed in plays, before deciding to move to Los Angeles.[1][2]

In Hollywood, Gertrude sought work as an actress, showgirl, and entertainment journalist at fan magazines.[3][4] Her one credited acting role was in 1935's Mary Burns, Fugitive; she also worked as a Ziegfeld Follies girl.[5]

Walker ended up on the writing staff at Republic Pictures, where she enjoyed the collegiate atmosphere and working with writer Dane Lussier. As Walker later recounted, she was almost laid off from the studio in 1944—until her boss saw her script for Silent Partner (which she had written in three days) and was blown away.[4] During her time later in the decade at Warner Brothers, she also gained recognition as a novelist; her 1948 title, So Deadly Fair, was named one of the 10 best mystery novels of the year.[6] In 1955, her novel Diamonds Don't Burn was published.[7]

In 1951, she married comedic actor Charles Winninger in Mexico; the pair remained married until his death.[8][9] They met years earlier when she was employed as his secretary.[10]

Selected worksEdit

Film:

TV:

Novel:

  • Diamond Don't Burn (1955)
  • So Deadly Fair (1948)
  • The King Was in Her Parlour (1944)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "26 Dec 1929, 28 - The Dayton Herald at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-02-22.
  2. ^ "16 May 1948, 58 - Dayton Daily News at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-02-22.
  3. ^ "15 May 1950, Page 12 - The Akron Beacon Journal at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-02-22.
  4. ^ a b "9 Jul 1978, 366 - The Los Angeles Times at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-02-22.
  5. ^ "24 Jun 1956, Page 67 - The Courier-Journal at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-02-22.
  6. ^ "3 Apr 1949, 48 - The Miami News at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-02-22.
  7. ^ "18 Apr 1946, 11 - The Los Angeles Times at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-02-22.
  8. ^ "10 Jul 1951, Page 19 - The Philadelphia Inquirer at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-02-22.
  9. ^ "17 Oct 1957, Page 10 - Santa Cruz Sentinel at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-02-22.
  10. ^ "29 Jan 1969, Page 21 - Tucson Daily Citizen at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-02-22.