German National Association of Commercial Employees

The German National Association of Commercial Employees, also known as the German National Union of Commercial Employees (German: Deutschnationaler Handlungsgehilfen-Verband, DHV) was a German nationalist and anti-Semitic labour union founded in Germany in 1893. It had links with the German Social Party and the Pan-German League.[1]

German National Association of Commercial Employees
Deutschnationaler Handlungsgehilfen-Verband
Formation1893
Dissolved1933
TypeFar-right trade union
PurposePromotion of reactionary politics
Membership (1932)
400,000
Official language
German

The DHV was directed against social democracy,[2] had an anti-democratic and anti-liberal ideology and supported the concept of a conservative revolution.[3] It promoted the interests of the merchant class. To prevent the spread of social democratic thoughts, it propagated patriotic and Völkisch mentality.[4] It is considered a proto-fascist or pre-fascist movement.[5] It existed between 1893 and 1933.[6]

By 1914, the DHV had 160,000 members and by 1932 it had over 400,000 members.[7] It cooperated with the Nazi Party and sought to unite Nazism and political Catholicism together.[8]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Patch, William L. (1985). Christian Trade Unions in the Weimar republic 19-18-1933: The Failure of "Corporate Pluralism". new Haven: Yale University Press. ISBN 0300033281.
  2. ^ Joan Campbell. European labor unions. Wesport, Connecticut, USA: Greenwood Press, 1992. pp. 163–164.
  3. ^ Larry Eugene Jones, James N. Retallack. Between Reform, Reaction, And Resistance: Studies in the History of German Conservatism from 1789 to 1945. Berg, 1993, p. 20.
  4. ^ Matthew Lange. Antisemitic anticapitalism in German culture from 1850-1933. University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2006, p. 224.
  5. ^ Peter Davies, Derek Lynch. The Routledge companion to fascism and the far right. London, England; New York, New York, USA: Routledge, p. 4.
  6. ^ Matthew Lange. Antisemitic anticapitalism in German culture from 1850-1933. University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2006. pp. 224.
  7. ^ Joan Campbell. European labor unions. Wesport, Connecticut, USA: Greenwood Press, 1992, p. 164.
  8. ^ Joan Campbell. European labor unions. Wesport, Connecticut, USA: Greenwood Press, 1992. pp. 163–164.

External linksEdit