Geneanet

Geneanet (GeneaNet according to the original spelling) is a genealogy website with 4 million members. The database consists of data added by participants and is intended to all genealogists. The website is collaborative and the data added by the members are available for free to any interested people. An optional annual subscription provides additional search options and additional records.[2][3]

Geneanet
Logo geneanet.jpg
Type of businessPrivate
HeadquartersParis, France
Founder(s)fr:Jacques Le Marois (CEO)
IndustryInternet
ProductsFamily history website
Genealogy software
Mobile application
Employees25
URLwww.geneanet.org
Alexa rank10,178 [1]
Launched1996; 24 years ago (1996)
Current statusActive

HistoryEdit

In 1996[4], Jacques Le Marois, Jérôme Abela and Julien Cassaigne, launched a website for "using the strength of the Internet to build a database indexing all the genealogical resources existing in the world, available or not online". The former name was "LPF" (List of surnames of France). Geneanet has officially launched on December 2, 1996.

The purpose of the site is, through the family trees shared by the members, to match hundreds of thousands of records and genealogical data, to maximize the opportunities of finding common ancestors and growing the family trees. A search in this index can tell if a surname has been investigated by a genealogist (mostly amateur) in a certain place and a certain period of time. Over the years, Geneanet has developed new tools: an internal mailbox, some charts and lists print tools, a digitized library... The number of unique visitors par month has increased from 330,000 in 2006 to more than 1 million in 2018[5]. In 2019, Geneanet has more than 2 million unique visitors per month and is called "heavyweight of the sector"[6].

In August 2012, the Geneanet database reached the milestone of 1 billion entries[7], then 2 billion in August 2015[8], and 6 billion in 2019.[9]

In September 2014, Geneanet launched a project for indexing soldiers in the First World War[10]. At that time, the site was hosting more than 530,000 family trees with 800 million individuals[11].

Since 2015, Geneanet participates in the genealogical exhibition which held in the town hall of the 15th arrondissement of Paris[12] In 2017, Geneanet signed a partnership with FamilySearch, allowing the LDS members to have a free Geneanet Premium subscription.[13]

In 2018, Geneanet takes part in the debate about DNA tests for genealogical purpose[14][15][16]. Since then, the site conducts surveys with its members (20,000 en 2018)[17].

On June 28, 2018, the CEO of Geneanet, Jacques Le Marois, was present at the Filae General Assembly, its main competitor, because the Trudaine Participations company (which more than 30% of the capital is held by Geneanet) has acquired 25% of the capital of Filae[18][19].

DescriptionEdit

Geneanet has 3 million members, 800,000 family trees and 6 billion indexed individuals as of March 2019. The site proposes three levels of use (visitor, registered and Premium): the second level allows to create a family tree, and the third level is a paid service which allows to have access to collections added by genealogy societies among other things[20][21].

Geneanet is a contributive, collaborative and fremium website. The site allows users to create a family tree with an unlimited number of individuals for free. A paid subscription allows members to more easily find information, to receive email alerts when new matches are available, to access a genealogy library with 3 billion indexed individuals, and to match their family tree to the database.

FeaturesEdit

The site Geneanet, based on GeneWeb, allows to calculate and display relationships between two persons in a family tree, and to highlight possible blood relationships. Some relationships between famous people have been relayed by the press.[22][23][24][25][26]

Since December 2015, Geneanet allows all the users to search the database through an advanced search engine which can perform queries by first name and last name, option which was reserved for paid members[27]. In September 2017, Geneanet has launched a new matching option for finding common persons between the family trees of the members[28].

Since 2018, Geneanet proposes a service to automatically create and print a family book from a family tree, through a partnership with the site Patronomia[29].

Geneanet DNAEdit

On February 17, 2020, Geneanet launched "Geneanet DNA", a service which allow users who have taken a DNA test to upload their DNA data and to find new relatives for free. [30] [31]

Other sites and projectsEdit

Geneanet has launched some other genealogy websites:

  • GeneaStar, for finding relationships with famous people[32].

Geneanet has also launched some mobile apps:

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Site Overview, Geneanet.org". Alexa.com. Retrieved 2020-03-10.
  2. ^ Capel, René (18 December 2017). "Présentation du logiciel Généanet". La Dépêche (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  3. ^ Peter, Christian (21 June 2012). "The Genealogist's Internet: The Essential Guide to Researching Your Family History Online". Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  4. ^ Noisette, Thierry (21 November 2016). "Généalogie : « Avec Internet, on va beaucoup plus loin et plus vite »" (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  5. ^ Dorion, Anne-Noémie (22 July 2011). "La généalogie, une passion française". Le Figaro (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  6. ^ Boquen, Manon (9 August 2019). "Comment la généalogie a pris un coup de jeune". Le Parisien (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  7. ^ Guiraud, Charles (3 November 2012). "Grâce à Internet, la généalogie à la portée de tous" (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  8. ^ Viguier-Vinson, Sophie (11 September 2015). "Généalogie: une passion bien française" (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  9. ^ Thébault, Frédéric (18 March 2019). "SIX MILLIARDS d'individus sur Geneanet !" (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  10. ^ "Geneanet recense les combattants de la Grande Guerre" (in French). 28 October 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  11. ^ "Geneanet recense les combattants de la Grande Guerre". Mission centenaire 14 - 18. 28 October 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  12. ^ Sauvage, Carole (10 March 2017). "Sur la piste de nos ancêtres au Salon de la Généalogie" (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  13. ^ Leslie Albrecht Huber, How to Make the Most of Your Free Geneanet Church Account, FamilySearch Blog, July 17, 2017
  14. ^ Kovacs, Stéphane (16 August 2019). "Filiation, généalogie : la révolution des tests ADN" (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  15. ^ de Morant, Guillaume (21 June 2018). "Sondage ADN : 56% des généalogistes interrogés souhaitent faire un test" (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  16. ^ Kovacs, Stéphane (16 August 2019). "Filiation, généalogie : la révolution des tests ADN" (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  17. ^ Boquen, Manon (9 August 2019). "Comment la généalogie a pris un coup de jeune". Le Parisien (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  18. ^ Hervis, Charles (26 July 2018). "Vers un rapprochement entre Filae et Geneanet ?". La Revue française de généalogie (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  19. ^ "Filae : Trudaine Participations est entré au capital à la hauteur de 25%". Capital.fr (in French). 10 July 2018. Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  20. ^ "La quotidienne Généalogie : la nouvelle coqueluche des Français". France 5 (in French). 18 January 2018. Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  21. ^ Noisette, Thierry (6 October 2016). "Généalogie : "Avec Internet, on va beaucoup plus loin et plus vite"". L'Obs (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  22. ^ Remia, Cédric (2 May 2017). "Improbable : Emmanuel Macron est le cousin d'un de ses adversaires politiques très célèbre !". Télé-Loisirs (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  23. ^ Mateus, Christine (14 December 2017). "Johnny et Jean d'Ormesson étaient cousins !". Le Parisien (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  24. ^ Poirier, Joseph (14 December 2017). "Généalogie : Johnny Hallyday était le cousin de Jean d'Ormesson". Pleine Vie (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  25. ^ Idbouja, Soraya (22 February 2019). "Karin Viard, Edouard Baer: ces stars des César avec un lien de parenté". Le Journal des Femmes (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  26. ^ Benhaiem, Annabel (29 July 2019). "Jacques Chirac était un lointain cousin de Georges Pompidou selon sa généalogie". Le Huffington Post (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  27. ^ de Morant, Guillaume (12 December 2015). "Geneanet, la nouvelle recherche accessible à tous". La Revue française de Généalogie (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  28. ^ de Morant, Guillaume (15 September 2017). "Geneanet lance une nouvelle fonction de comparaison". La Revue française de Généalogie (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  29. ^ de Morant, Guillaume (10 December 2015). "Le livre automatique Patronomia partenaire de Geneanet". La Revue française de Généalogie (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  30. ^ Océane Simon, Geneanet, the Leading Genealogy Website in Europe, Launches Its DNA Matching Service, BioSpace, February 25, 2020
  31. ^ Valorie Cowan Zimmerman, Geneanet - now for DNA matching too!,South King County Genealogy Society Blog, February 23, 2020
  32. ^ Boudarel, Sophie (2 March 2016). "Entrez dans le laboratoire de Geneanet". La Revue française de Généalogie (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  33. ^ de Morant, Guillaume (21 August 2017). "Sauvons nos tombes : plus d'un million de photos publiées". La Revue française de Généalogie (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  34. ^ "« Des racines et des arbres » : la généalogie, une passion française". France 3 Paris Île-de-France (in French). 9 February 2018. Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  35. ^ "Nos cimetières deviennent des mines d'informations". France Inter (in French). 20 March 2018. Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  36. ^ "2,3 millions de sépultures sauvées grâce à l'initiative "Sauvons nos tombes"". SeniorActu (in French). 16 September 2019. Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  37. ^ de Morant, Guillaume (16 July 2015). "Généanet vous fait voir aujourd'hui comment était hier..." La Revue française de Généalogie (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  38. ^ Tanguy, Delphine (7 February 2017). "Une appli pour visiter Marseille et l'Histoire". La Provence (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  39. ^ Cadier, Elsa (29 March 2017). "Tours : l'appli Hier & Aujourd'hui géolocalise et vous plonge dans le passé". France 3 Centre-Val de Loire (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  40. ^ Collet, Olivier (24 July 2017). "Les vieilles cartes postales de Tours réunies dans une appli". Info-Tours.fr (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  41. ^ Hourdeaux, Anne-Sophie (1 September 2019). "Une appli pour voir le Lille d'antan". Lilleactu (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  42. ^ "Hier / aujourd'hui : 250 photos nostalgiques des Hauts-de-France". France 3 Hauts-de-France (in French). 10 September 2017. Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  43. ^ Rafali-Clausse, Tiana (14 November 2017). "PHOTOS : Les spots les plus touristiques de Paris dans les années 1900". Le Bonbon (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  44. ^ Camier, Gérald (5 August 2018). "Toulouse : l'application pour visiter «Hier & aujourd'hui»". ladepeche.fr (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.
  45. ^ Gerner, Daniel (23 November 2018). "On a testé à Strasbourg l'application gratuite "Hier&Aujourd'hui": un voyage dans le temps... plutôt tentant". France 3 Grand Est (in French). Retrieved 3 March 2020.