Galloway and Upper Nithsdale (UK Parliament constituency)

Galloway and Upper Nithsdale was a county constituency which returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, elected by the first past the post voting system.

Galloway and Upper Nithsdale
Former County constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Galloway and Upper Nithsdale in Scotland for the 2001 general election
19832005
Replaced byDumfries and Galloway
Created fromGalloway and Dumfries[1]

The constituency was created for the 1983 general election (partly replacing the former Galloway constituency), and abolished for the 2005 general election, when it was replaced by Dumfries and Galloway.

The constituency was notable in being the only seat in all of Scotland won by the Conservative Party at the 2001 general election, and was one of the very few seats that changed hands in that election.

BoundariesEdit

1983–1997: Stewartry District, Wigtown District, and the Nithsdale District electoral divisions of Kirkconnel, Mabie, Mid Nithsdale, and Sanquhar and Queensberry.

1997–2005: Stewartry District, Wigtown District, and the Nithsdale District electoral divisions of Queensberry, Upper Nithsdale, and West Nithsdale.

Members of ParliamentEdit

Election Member [2] Party
1983 Ian Lang Conservative
1997 Alasdair Morgan SNP
2001 Peter Duncan Conservative
2005 constituency abolished

Election resultsEdit

 
Galloway constituencies election results

Elections of the 1980sEdit

General election 1983: Galloway and Upper Nithsdale[3]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Ian Lang 17,579 44.7 N/A
SNP George Thompson 12,118 30.8 N/A
Liberal Gerald Douglas 5,129 13.0 N/A
Labour Malcolm Miller 4,464 11.4 N/A
Majority 5,461 13.9 N/A
Turnout 39,290 75.8 N/A
Conservative win (new seat)
General election 1987: Galloway and Upper Nithsdale[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Ian Lang 16,592 40.4 −4.3
SNP Stephen Norris 12,919 31.5 +0.7
Liberal John McKercher 6,001 14.6 +1.6
Labour James Gray 5,298 12.9 +1.5
Independent Dan Kenny 230 0.6 N/A
Majority 3,673 9.0 -4.9
Turnout 41,040 76.8 +1.0
Conservative hold Swing

Elections of the 1990sEdit

General election 1992: Galloway and Upper Nithsdale[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Ian Lang 18,681 42.0 +1.6
SNP Matt Brown 16,213 36.5 +5.0
Labour John Dowson 5,766 13.0 +0.1
Liberal Democrats John McKerchar 3,826 8.6 −6.0
Majority 2,468 5.6 -3.4
Turnout 44,486 81.7 +4.9
Conservative hold Swing
General election 1997: Galloway and Upper Nithsdale[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
SNP Alasdair Morgan 18,449 43.9 +7.5
Conservative Ian Lang 12,825 30.5 −11.5
Labour Katy Clark 6,861 16.3 +3.4
Liberal Democrats John McKerchar 2,700 6.4 −2.2
Independent Robert Wood 566 1.4 N/A
Referendum Alan Kennedy 428 1.0 N/A
UKIP Joseph Smith 189 0.4 N/A
Majority 5,624 13.4
Turnout 42,018 79.7 −2.0
SNP gain from Conservative Swing

Elections of the 2000sEdit

General election 2001: Galloway and Upper Nithsdale[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Peter Duncan 12,222 34.0 +3.5
SNP Malcolm Fleming 12,148 33.8 −10.1
Labour Thomas Sloan 7,258 20.2 +3.9
Liberal Democrats Neil Wallace 3,698 10.3 +3.9
Scottish Socialist Andy Harvey 588 1.6 N/A
Majority 74 0.2
Turnout 35,914 67.4 −12.2
Conservative gain from SNP Swing

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "'Galloway and Upper Nithsdale', June 1983 up to May 1997". ElectionWeb Project. Cognitive Computing Limited. Archived from the original on 12 March 2016. Retrieved 11 March 2016.
  2. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "G" (part 1)
  3. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  4. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  5. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  6. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  7. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 28 June 2017.