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Coordinates: 32°50′33″N 96°50′07″W / 32.8424°N 96.8353°W / 32.8424; -96.8353

Frontiers of Flight Museum
Frontiers of Flight Museum December 2015 003.jpg
Front entrance
Frontiers of Flight Museum is located in Texas
Frontiers of Flight Museum
Location within Texas
Established1988
LocationDallas, Texas
TypeAviation museum
FounderJan Collmer, William E. “Bill” Cooper, Kay Bailey Hutchison
Websitewww.flightmuseum.com

The Frontiers of Flight Museum is an aerospace museum located in Dallas, Texas, founded in November 1988 by William E. Cooper, Kay Bailey Hutchison, and Jan Collmer.[1] Originally located within a terminal at Dallas Love Field, the museum now occupies a 100,000-square-foot (9,300 m2) building at the southeast corner of Love Field on Lemmon Avenue.[1] The museum is an affiliate within the Smithsonian Affiliations program.[2]

Aviation historian George E. Haddaway promoted the founding of the museum subsequent to donation of his extensive personal collection of aviation history books, journals, photographs, as well as archives to the University of Texas at Dallas as the nucleus of one of the world's finest aviation collections, the History of Aviation Collection.[3]

The museum features an extensive collection of aviation history artifacts and vehicles, and focuses on the history of aviation and space exploration with an emphasis on the role of the Dallas/Fort Worth area. Exhibits include the Apollo 7 Command Module;[4] a World War I Sopwith Pup biplane replica;[5] artifacts from the German airship Hindenburg and other airships; and over 200 World War II aircraft models.

Contents

Aircraft on displayEdit

GalleryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Frontiers of Flight Museum site Archived 2009-03-20 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ "Frontiers of Flight Museum". Affiliate detail. Smithsonian Affiliations. 2011. Retrieved 16 Jul 2011.
  3. ^ Texas Aviation Hall of Fame George E. Haddaway
  4. ^ "APOLLO VII". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  5. ^ a b "Sopwith "Pup"". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  6. ^ "Bell 47 (H-13)". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  7. ^ "Bell TH-1L "Iroquois" ("Huey")". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  8. ^ "Bell UH-1D "Iroquois" ("Huey")". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  9. ^ "Boeing 737-200 (nose section)". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  10. ^ "Boeing 737-300". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  11. ^ "Boeing/Stearman PT-17 "Kadet"". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  12. ^ "Bücker Bü 133 "Jungmeister"". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  13. ^ "Culver "Dart GC"". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  14. ^ "Curtiss JN-4D "Jenny"". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  15. ^ "de Havilland "Tiger Moth" DH82H". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  16. ^ "E-Systems XQM-93A (L-450)". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  17. ^ "Glasflügel BS-1". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  18. ^ "Laser 200". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  19. ^ "Learavia Lear Fan 2100". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  20. ^ "Learjet Model 24D". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  21. ^ "Lockheed T-33A "Shooting Star"". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  22. ^ "Lockheed Martin F-16B "Fighting Falcon"". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  23. ^ "LTV A-7 "Corsair II"". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  24. ^ "Meyer's Special "Little Toot"". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  25. ^ "Northrop T-38 "Talon"". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  26. ^ "Pitts S-2B". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  27. ^ "Republic F-105D "Thunderchief"". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  28. ^ "Ryan PT-22 "Recruit"". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  29. ^ "Williams "Texas Temple" Sportsman Monoplane". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  30. ^ "Chance Vought RF-8G "Crusader"". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  31. ^ "Chance Vought V-173 "Flying Pancake"". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.
  32. ^ "1903 Wright Flyer (model)". Frontiers of Flight Museum. Retrieved September 13, 2018.

External linksEdit