Francisco (moon)

Francisco is the innermost irregular satellite of Uranus.

Francisco
Discovery
Discovered by
Discovery dateAugust 13, 2001[1][2] (confirmed in 2003[1][3])
Designations
Designation
Uranus XXII
Pronunciation/frænˈsɪsk/[4]
AdjectivesFranciscan, Fransiscian, Francisconian
Orbital characteristics
Mean orbit radius
4,276,000 km[5][6]
Eccentricity0.1459[6]
266.56 d
Inclination145° (to the ecliptic)[5]
Satellite ofUranus
Physical characteristics
Mean radius
11 km (estimate)[7]
~1,500 km2 (estimate)
Volume~6,000 km3 (estimate)
Mass~7.2×1015 kg (estimate)
Mean density
~1.3 g/cm3 (assumed)
~0.0025 m/s2 (estimate)
~0.0094 km/s (estimate)
?
?
Albedo0.04 (assumed)[7]
Temperature~65 K (estimate)

Francisco was discovered by Matthew J. Holman, et al. and Brett J. Gladman, et al. in 2003 from pictures taken in 2001 and given the provisional designation S/2001 U 3. Confirmed as Uranus XXII, it was named after a lord in William Shakespeare's play The Tempest.[8]

Animation of Francisco's orbit around Uranus.
   Uranus
   Sycorax
   Francisco
   Caliban
   Stephano
   Trinculo

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Green, Daniel W. E. (2003-10-07). "IAUC 8216: S/2001 U 3". IAU Circular. Retrieved 2011-01-08.
  2. ^ Blue, Jennifer (2008-10-16). "Planet and Satellite Names and Discoverers". Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature (WGPSN). Retrieved 2008-12-19.
  3. ^ Sheppard, Scott S. "New Satellites of Uranus Discovered in 2003". Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii. Archived from the original on January 16, 2009. Retrieved 2008-12-19.
  4. ^ Benjamin Smith (1903) The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  5. ^ a b Sheppard, Jewitt & Kleyna 2005, p. 523, Table 3.
  6. ^ a b Jacobson, R.A. (2003) URA067 (2007-06-28). "Planetary Satellite Mean Orbital Parameters". JPL/NASA. Retrieved 2008-01-23.
  7. ^ a b Sheppard, Jewitt & Kleyna 2005, p. 523, Table 3 ... ri (km) ... 11 ... i Radius of satellite assuming a geometric albedo of 0.04.
  8. ^ "Planet and Satellite Names and Discoverers". Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature. USGS Astrogeology. July 21, 2006. Retrieved 2006-08-06.

External linksEdit