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Frances Fuller (March 16, 1907 in Charleston, South Carolina – December 18, 1980 in New York City) was an American actress.[1][2][3][4] She is the grandmother of the actress Rachel Miner and the niece of the Supreme Court Justice and Secretary of State James Francis Byrnes (former Governor of South Carolina).

Frances Fuller
Born(1907-03-16)March 16, 1907
DiedDecember 18, 1980(1980-12-18) (aged 73)
OccupationActress
Years active1933–1971
Spouse(s)Worthington Miner
(m. 19??; d. 1980)
Children3

Fuller graduated from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York City in 1928, and was a director and president there from 1954 to 1965.[5] Her film career began with One Sunday Afternoon (1933).[6]

Fuller's Broadway credits include The Lady of the Camellias (1963), Home Is the Hero (1954), Excursion (1937), Stage Door (1936), Her Master's Voice (1933), I Loved You Wednesday (1932), The Animal Kingdom (1932), Five Star Final (1930), Cafe (1930), and The Front Page (1928).[7]

On television, Fuller was a member of the cast of Flame In The Wind, a soap opera on ABC in the mid-1960s.[8]

Fuller was married to producer Worthington Miner,[4] with whom she had three children, and appeared in many productions on Broadway during the 1930s.

FilmographyEdit

Year Title Role Notes
1933 One Sunday Afternoon Amy Lind
1934 Elmer and Elsie Elsie Beebe
1955 The Girl in the Red Velvet Swing Elizabeth White
1971 They Might Be Giants Mrs. Bagg
1974 Homebodies Miss Emily (final film role)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Hawes, William (2001). Live Television Drama, 1946_1951. McFarland. p. 88. ISBN 9780786409051. Retrieved 15 January 2019.
  2. ^ Rapf, Maurice (1999). Back Lot: Growing Up with the Movies. Scarecrow Press. p. 80. ISBN 9780810835832. Retrieved 15 January 2019.
  3. ^ Fisher, James (2011). Historical Dictionary of Contemporary American Theater: 1930-2010. Scarecrow Press. p. 756. ISBN 9780810879508. Retrieved 15 January 2019.
  4. ^ a b Shelley, Peter (2017). Anne Bancroft: The Life and Work. McFarland. p. 5. ISBN 9781476628585. Retrieved 15 January 2019.
  5. ^ "Profile of Star: Frances Fuller". The Daily Item. Pennsylvania, Sunbury. February 19, 1965. p. 29. Retrieved 16 January 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Frances Fuller Will Return to Film Work". The Los Angeles Times. California, Los Angeles. April 18, 1934. p. 13. Retrieved 15 January 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Frances Fuller". Internet Broadway Database. The Broadway League. Archived from the original on 16 January 2019. Retrieved 16 January 2019.
  8. ^ "New Look for Daytime Shows". The Daily Item. Pennsylvania, Sunbury. January 2, 1965. p. 14. Retrieved 16 January 2019 – via Newspapers.com.

External linksEdit