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Walking through a bamboo forest in Arashiyama, Kyoto

Forest bathing is the practice of taking a short, leisurely visit to a forest for health benefits. The practice originated in Japan where it is called shinrin-yoku (森林浴) in Japanese [1] (it is also called sēnlínyù (森林浴) in Mandarin and sanlimyok (산림욕) in Korean).[citation needed]

The practice is proven by scientists to benefit physical as well is mental health as it help lower heart rate, blood pressure, reduce stress hormone production, boost immunity and mood[2], and improve overall feelings of wellbeing.[3]

A research showed significant increases in human natural killer cell activity after forest bathing and its positive effects last a month following each weekend in the woods.[4]

Shinrin Yoku Samurai Spain 侍

There has been interest in forest bathing in the US[5] and the UK.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Selhub, Eva (January 8, 2013). "Your Brain on Nature: Forest Bathing and Reduced Stress". Mother Earth News. 
  2. ^ Barr, Philip (July 17, 2017). "Forest Bathing: A Retreat To Nature Can Boost Immunity And Mood". National Public Radio. 
  3. ^ Quartz, Media (October 12, 2016). "The Japanese practice of 'forest bathing' is scientifically proven to improve your health". Quartz Media. 
  4. ^ Livni, Ephrat (October 12, 2016). "The Japanese practice of 'forest bathing' is scientifically proven to improve your health". Quartz Media. 
  5. ^ Kim, Meeri (May 17, 2016). "'Forest bathing' is latest fitness trend to hit U.S. — 'Where yoga was 30 years ago'". Washington Post. Retrieved 25 May 2017. 
  6. ^ "Britain's most therapeutic forests - and how to enjoy them". The Telegraph. June 29, 2017. Retrieved June 29, 2017.