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Fiona McFarlane (born 1978) is an Australian author, best known for her book, The Night Guest and her collection of short stories, The High Places. She is a recipient of the Voss Literary Prize, the UTS Glenda Adams Award for New Writing at the New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards, and the Dylan Thomas Prize.

Fiona McFarlane
Born1978
NationalityAustralian
OccupationAuthor
Notable work
The Night Guest (2013)
The High Places (2016)

Contents

Life and careerEdit

McFarlane was born in Sydney, Australia in 1978.[1] She studied English at the University of Sydney, the University of Cambridge and the University of Texas at Austin.[2]

Her debut novel, The Night Guest, was published in 2013 and is about a retired widow who lives alone and suffers from dementia.[3] It won the Voss Literary Prize and the UTS Glenda Adams Award for New Writing at the New South Wales Premier's Literary Awards.[4] It was also shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Award,[5] The Stella Prize[4] and the Guardian First Book Award.[6]

In 2017, McFarlane won the Dylan Thomas Prize for her collection of short stories, The High Places.[4]

McFarlane's writing has also appeared in Zoetrope: All-Story, Southerly and The New Yorker.[2]

BibliographyEdit

NovelEdit

  • McFarlane, Fiona (2013), The Night Guest, Penguin Group (Australia), ISBN 978-1-926428-55-0

Collection of short storiesEdit

  • McFarlane, Fiona (2016), The High Places, Hamish Hamilton an imprint of Penguin Books, ISBN 978-1-926428-56-7

Short stories in anthologiesEdit

  • "Movie People" in Kennedy, Cate (2010), The best Australian stories 2010, Black Inc, ISBN 978-1-86395-495-2
  • "Exotic Animal Medicine" in Tuffield, Aviva (2010), New Australian stories 2, Scribe, ISBN 978-1-921640-86-5
  • "I Will Tell You Something" in Adelaide, Debra, 1958–, (editor.) (2015), The Simple Act of Reading, Vintage Books, ISBN 978-0-85798-624-5CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  • "Good News for Modern Man" in Wood, Charlotte, 1965–, (editor.) (2016), The best Australian stories 2016, Black Inc, ISBN 978-1-86395-886-8CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  • "Buttony" in Furman, Laura, (author of introduction, etc.); Bradley, David, 1950–, (writer of supplementary textual content.); McCracken, Elizabeth, (writer of supplementary textual content.); Watson, Brad, 1955–, (writer of supplementary textual content.) (2017), The O. Henry Prize stories 2017, New York Anchor Books, ISBN 978-0-525-43250-0CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Fiona McFarlane". www.swansea.ac.uk. Retrieved 26 February 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Fiona McFarlane". milesfranklin.com.au. 1 March 2015. Retrieved 26 February 2018.
  3. ^ Maier, Heidi (21 May 2014). "Fiona McFarlane: 'I wanted to explore dementia from the inside'". the Guardian. Retrieved 26 February 2018.
  4. ^ a b c Morris, Linda (11 May 2017). "Australia's Fiona McFarlane wins $50,000 Dylan Thomas prize". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 26 February 2018.
  5. ^ "Miles Franklin Award 2014 Short". milesfranklin.com.au. 15 February 2015. Retrieved 26 February 2018.
  6. ^ Flood, Alison (14 November 2014). "Guardian first book award 2014 shortlist covers neurosurgery, China, rural Ireland and more". the Guardian. Retrieved 26 February 2018.