Film Critics Circle of Australia

The Film Critics Circle of Australia (FCCA) is an association of cinema critics and reviewers. It includes journalists in "media, television, major national and state papers, radio, national and state, online and freelance writers, Australian representatives from international magazines..and local specialist film magazines", and is based in Sydney.[1]

The FCCA Annual Awards for Australian Film, rewarding makers of feature films and documentaries is highly regarded.[1]

HistoryEdit

The Sydney Film Critics' Circle became a national organisation as the Film Critics' Circle of Australia by October 1988.[2] It joined International Federation of Film Critics (FIPRESCI), "which will allow its members to be considered for jury duty at international festivals, accreditation at festivals and markets."[2]

The FCCA Awards have been presented each year since September 1988, with the inaugural winners including two awards each for The Year My Voice Broke: best director (John Duigan) and best male actor (Noah Taylor); and Shame: best screenplay (Beverly Blankenship and Michael Brindley) and best female actor (Deborra-Lee Furness).[2][3]

2019Edit

In 2019, the categories were Best Film, Best Director/Universal Pictures Award; Best Actor / Toil Films Award; Best Actress; Best Cinematography; Best Original Score / AGSC Award; Best Screenplay (Original Or Adapted) / Bunya Productions Award; Best Editor; Best Actor Supporting Role; Best Actress Supporting Role / MB Films Award;Best Feature Documentary / Kudos Knowledge Award.[4]

PresidentsEdit

Presidents of the FCCA have included:

  • 1991–1993: Sandra Hall[5]
  • 1994–1996: Peter Crayford[5]
  • 1997–2000: John Hanrahan[6]
  • 2001–2003: Julie Rigg[7]
  • 2004–2006: Russell Edwards
  • 2007–2010: Paolo Remati
  • 2011–2014: Rod Quinn[8]
  • 2015–2016: Russell Edwards[9]
  • 2017–2020: Rose Capp[10]
  • 2020–current (as of September 2020): CJ Johnson

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "About the FCCA". Film Critics Association of Australia. Retrieved 25 April 2020.
  2. ^ a b c "From the Cutting Room Floor". Filmnews. Vol. 18, no. 9. 1 October 1988. p. 4. Retrieved 27 September 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  3. ^ Film Critics Circle of Australia Awards:
    • 1998–2001: "Previous Awards (3)". Film Critics Association of Australia. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
    • 2002–2010: "Previous Awards (2)". Film Critics Association of Australia. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
    • 2011–2019: "Previous Awards". Film Critics Association of Australia. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
    Note: the official website only lists years back to 1998: as from September 2020 no details of awardees are available for years 1998 to 2013.
  4. ^ "2019 Awards Winners". Film Critics Association of Australia. Retrieved 25 April 2020.
  5. ^ a b "Madrid to See Oz Experimental Cinema: Crayford New Head of Critics' Circle of Australia". Filmnews. Vol. 24, no. 1. 1 February 1994. p. 4. Retrieved 27 September 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ Ramshaw, Victoria (21 September 1999). "Media Release - Film Critics' Circle of Australia and ScreenSound Australia present Film Criticism Workshop". ScreenSound Australia. Archived from the original on 19 July 2005. Retrieved 29 September 2020 – via Trove.
  7. ^ "Urban Cinefile Feature: Critics Set New Date". Urban Cinefile. 14 August 2002. Archived from the original on 16 August 2002. Retrieved 28 September 2020 – via Trove.
  8. ^ "About Us". Film Critics Circle of Australia. Archived from the original on 1 June 2014. Retrieved 27 September 2020.
  9. ^ Freebury, Jane (2 February 2016). "FCCA Annual Awards 2015". FCCA. Archived from the original on 6 April 2019. Retrieved 28 September 2020 – via National Library of Australia.
  10. ^ Foster, Simon (4 April 2019). "FCCA 2018 Winners Span a Centura of Australian Stories - Industry". Screen-Space. Retrieved 28 September 2020.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit