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File:Chinese infantry soldier preparing a suicide vest of Model 24 hand grenades at the Battle of Taierzhuang against Japanese Tanks.jpg

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Summary[edit]

Description
English: A Chinese infantry soldier during the Battle of Taierzhuang putting on a explosive suicide vest made out of Model 24 hand grenades to use in a suicide bombing against a Japanese tank. Due to lack of anti-armor weaponry, Suicide bombing was also used against the Japanese. Chinese troops strapped explosives like grenade packs or dynamite to their bodies and threw themselves under Japanese tanks to blow them up.[1] Dynamite and grenades were strapped on by Chinese troops who rushed at Japanese tanks and blew themselves up.[2][3][4][5][6] During one incident at Taierzhuang, Chinese suicide bombers obliterated four Japanese tanks with grenade bundles.[7][8]
Date
Source https://web.archive.org/web/20110709203351/http://numistamp.com/Taierzhuang-1938----Stalingrad-1942-%28Page-1%29.php
Author World War II photographer
Permission
(Reusing this file)
Public domain
This image is now in the public domain in China because its term of copyright has expired. According to copyright laws of the People's Republic of China (with legal jurisdiction in the mainland only, excluding Hong Kong and Macao) and the Republic of China (currently with jurisdiction in Taiwan, the Penghu, Kinmen, Matsu, etc.), all photographs and cinematographic works, and all works whose copyright holder is a juristic person, enter the public domain 50 years after they were first published, or if unpublished 50 years from creation, and all other applicable works enter the public domain 50 years after the death of the creator.
Important note: Works of foreign (non-U.S.) origin must be out of copyright or freely licensed in both their home country and the United States in order to be accepted on Commons. Works of Chinese origin that have entered the public domain in the U.S. due to certain circumstances (such as publication in noncompliance with U.S. copyright formalities) may have had their U.S. copyright restored under the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (URAA) if the work was under copyright in its country of origin on the date that the URAA took effect in that country. (For the People's Republic of China, the URAA took effect on January 1, 1996. For the Republic of China (ROC), the URAA took effect on January 1, 2002.[1])

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Dialog-warning.svgYou must also include a United States public domain tag to indicate why this work is in the public domain in the United States. Note that this work might not be in the public domain in countries that do not apply the rule of the shorter term and have copyright terms longer than life of the author plus 50 years. In particular, Mexico is 100 years, Jamaica is 95 years, Colombia is 80 years, Guatemala and Samoa are 75 years, Switzerland and the United States are 70 years, and Venezuela is 60 years.

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Licensing[edit]

Public domain
This image is now in the public domain in China because its term of copyright has expired. According to copyright laws of the People's Republic of China (with legal jurisdiction in the mainland only, excluding Hong Kong and Macao) and the Republic of China (currently with jurisdiction in Taiwan, the Penghu, Kinmen, Matsu, etc.), all photographs and cinematographic works, and all works whose copyright holder is a juristic person, enter the public domain 50 years after they were first published, or if unpublished 50 years from creation, and all other applicable works enter the public domain 50 years after the death of the creator.
Important note: Works of foreign (non-U.S.) origin must be out of copyright or freely licensed in both their home country and the United States in order to be accepted on Commons. Works of Chinese origin that have entered the public domain in the U.S. due to certain circumstances (such as publication in noncompliance with U.S. copyright formalities) may have had their U.S. copyright restored under the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (URAA) if the work was under copyright in its country of origin on the date that the URAA took effect in that country. (For the People's Republic of China, the URAA took effect on January 1, 1996. For the Republic of China (ROC), the URAA took effect on January 1, 2002.[2])

To uploader: Please provide where the image was first published and who created it or held its copyright.

Dialog-warning.svgYou must also include a United States public domain tag to indicate why this work is in the public domain in the United States. Note that this work might not be in the public domain in countries that do not apply the rule of the shorter term and have copyright terms longer than life of the author plus 50 years. In particular, Mexico is 100 years, Jamaica is 95 years, Colombia is 80 years, Guatemala and Samoa are 75 years, Switzerland and the United States are 70 years, and Venezuela is 60 years.

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  1. Schaedler, Luc (Accepted in Autumn Semester 2007 On the Recommendation of Prof. Dr. Michael Oppitz) Angry Monk: Reflections on Tibet: Literary, Historical, and Oral Sources for a Documentary Film(Thesis Presented to the Faculty of Arts of the University of Zurich For the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy)[3], University of Zurich, Faculty of Arts, archived from the original on 2010/09, retrieved 24 April 2014, page 518
  2. (Summer 2001). "Chinese Tank Forces and Battles before 1949". TANKS! e-Magazine (Issue #4). Retrieved on 2 August 2014.
  3. Xin Hui (1-8-2002). "Xinhui Presents: Chinese Tank Forces and Battles before 1949:". Newsletter 1-8-2002 Articles. Retrieved on 2 August 2014.
  4. Ong, Siew Chew () China Condensed: 5000 Years of History & Culture (illustrated ed.), Marshall Cavendish, p. 94 Retrieved on 24 April 2014. ISBN: 9812610677.
  5. () Taierzhuang 1938 – Stalingrad 1942, Clear Mind Publishing Retrieved on 24 April 2014. ISBN: 978-0-9838435-9-7.
  6. STORM OVER TAIERZHUANG 1938 PLAYER’S AID SHEET. grognard.com. Retrieved on 24 April 2014.
  7. () International Press Correspondence, Volume 18, Richard Neumann, p. 447 Retrieved on 24 April 2014.
  8. Epstein, Israel () The people's war, V. Gollancz, p. 172 Retrieved on 24 April 2014.

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Date/TimeThumbnailDimensionsUserComment
current03:28, 15 June 2015Thumbnail for version as of 03:28, 15 June 2015590 × 636 (131 KB)MilktacoUser created page with UploadWizard
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