February 1990 lunar eclipse

Total Lunar Eclipse
February 9, 1990
(No photo)
Lunar eclipse chart close-1990Feb09.png
The moon passes west to east (right to left) across the Earth's umbral shadow, shown in hourly intervals.
Series 133 (25 of 71)
Gamma -0.4148
Magnitude 1.0750
Duration (hr:mn:sc)
Totality 42:18
Partial 3:24:18
Penumbral 5:39:36
Contacts (UTC)
P1 16:22:14
U1 17:29:53
U2 18:50:53
Greatest 19:12:02
U3 19:33:11
U4 20:54:11
P4 22:01:50

A total lunar eclipse took place on Friday, February 9, 1990, the first of two lunar eclipses in 1990.[1]

VisibilityEdit

It was visible from all of Africa, Europe, Asia and Australia. The eclipse is sighted over the Philippines since the one happened on February 20, 1989.

 

Related eclipsesEdit

Eclipses of 1990Edit

Lunar year seriesEdit

Lunar eclipse series sets from 1988–1991
Descending node   Ascending node
Saros Date Type
Viewing
Gamma Saros Date
Viewing
Type
Chart
Gamma
113 1988 Mar 03
 
Penumbral
 
0.98855 118 1988 Aug 27
 
Partial
 
-0.86816
123 1989 Feb 20
 
Total
 
0.29347 128 1989 Aug 17
 
Total
 
-0.14905
133 1990 Feb 09
 
Total
 
-0.41481 138 1990 Aug 06
 
Partial
 
0.63741
143 1991 Jan 30
 
Penumbral
 
-1.07522 148 1991 Jul 26
 
Penumbral
 
1.43698
Last set 1987 Apr 14 Last set 1987 Oct 07
Next set 1991 Dec 21 Next set 1991 Jun 27

Lunar Saros 133Edit

This lunar eclipse is part of series 133 of the Saros cycle, which repeats every 18 years and 11 days. Series 133 runs from the year 1557 until 2819. The previous eclipse of this series occurred on January 30, 1972 and the next will occur on February 21, 2008.

It is the 5th of 21 total lunar eclipses in series 133. The first was on December 28, 1917. The last (21st) will be on August 3, 2278. The longest two occurrences of this series (14th and 15th) will last for a total of 1 hour and 42 minutes on May 18, 2152 and May 30, 2170. Solar saros 140 interleaves with this lunar saros with an event occurring every 9 years 5 days alternating between each saros series.

Half-Saros cycleEdit

A lunar eclipse will be preceded and followed by solar eclipses by 9 years and 5.5 days (a half saros).[2] This lunar eclipse is related to two annular solar eclipses of Solar Saros 140.

February 4, 1981 February 16, 1999
   

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Hermit Eclipse: Saros cycle 133
  2. ^ Mathematical Astronomy Morsels, Jean Meeus, p.110, Chapter 18, The half-saros

External linksEdit