Falter (English: Butterfly) is a weekly news magazine published in Vienna, Austria.

Falter
FalterLogo.svg
Editor-in-chiefArmin Thurnher, Florian Klenk
CategoriesNews magazine
FrequencyWeekly
PublisherFalter Verlagsgesellschaft
FounderWalter Martin Kienreich
Year founded1977; 44 years ago (1977)
CountryAustria
Based inVienna
LanguageGerman
WebsiteFalter

History and profileEdit

 
Slogan of the Viennese weekly magazine Falter at the presentation of the 2001 book Früher war hier das Ende der Welt – Reportagen by Florian Klenk [de]

Established in 1977, Falter is published weekly on Wednesdays.[1] The magazine was founded by Walter Martin Kienreich. The publisher is Falter Verlagsgesellschaft.[2] The magazine has no political affiliation.[3] Its headquarters is in Vienna.[4]

Falter reports from a broadly left-liberal perspective on politics, media, culture and the life in Vienna.[1][2] Since Spring 2005 a local edition has also been published in Styria. The weekly has a science supplement, Heureka, which is supported by the Austrian Ministry of Education and Science.[5] The supplement features critical analyses of scientific activities, science policy, science/society relationships and university-based science and each issue focuses on a scientific topic, including genetics, science and politics among the others.[4] It is distributed not only to the readers of Falter but also to university departments, the relevant ministries and other related institutions.[4]

In addition to its original role as a magazine of the arts and social life, Falter has also developed a reputation for investigative journalism.[1][2]

The 2007 circulation of Falter was 63,000 copies.[2] In 2010 its circulation was 48,000 copies.[6]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "The Austrian media landscape". Wien International. Archived from the original on 14 October 2013. Retrieved 7 October 2013.
  2. ^ a b c d "Falter". Euro Topics. Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  3. ^ Kimberly Bradley (October 2014). "Alive and kicking". Monocle. 77 (8). Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  4. ^ a b c Ulrike Felt; Martina Erlemann (June 2003). "The Austrian media landscape: Mass-production of public images of science and technology". OPUS Report. Archived from the original on 13 October 2013. Retrieved 1 January 2015.
  5. ^ "Biotechnology" (PDF). EU. 31 May 2002. Archived from the original (Report) on 7 October 2013. Retrieved 5 October 2013.
  6. ^ "Western Europe Media Facts. 2011 Edition" (PDF). ZenithOptimedia. Retrieved 6 March 2016.

External linksEdit