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FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin

The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin has been published monthly since 1932 by the FBI Law Enforcement Communication Unit,[2] with articles of interest to state and local law enforcement personnel. First published in 1932 as Fugitives Wanted by Police,[3] the FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin covers topics including law enforcement technology and issues, such as crime mapping and use of force, as well as recent criminal justice research, and VICAP alerts, on wanted suspects and key cases.

Federal Bureau of Investigation
Badge of a Federal Bureau of Investigation special agent.png
Badge of the Federal Bureau of Investigation
Flag of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.svg
Common nameFederal Bureau of Investigation
AbbreviationFBI
MottoFidelity, Bravery, Integrity
Agency overview
FormedJuly 26, 1908; 111 years ago (1908-07-26)
Employees35,104[1] (October 31, 2014)
Annual budgetUS$8.3 billion (FY 2014)[1]
Jurisdictional structure
Federal agency
(Operations jurisdiction)
United States
Operations jurisdictionUnited States
Legal jurisdictionAs per operations jurisdiction
Governing bodyU.S. Department of Justice
Constituting instrument
General nature
HeadquartersJ. Edgar Hoover Building
Northwest, Washington, D.C.

Sworn members13,260 (October 31, 2014)[1]
Unsworn members18,306 (October 31, 2014)[1]
Agency executives
Child agencies
Major units
Field offices56 (List of FBI Field Offices)
Notables
People
Programmes
Significant operation(s)
Website
www.fbi.gov

It was distributed to depository libraries which selected to receive it through v. 70 #3 (March 2001), at which GPO determined the online version provided a suitable alternative to hardcopy distribution.

It discontinued printing hard copy issues after December 2012.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Frequently Asked Questions". Federal Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved 2016-09-02.
  2. ^ "Law Enforcement Communication Unit". Federal Bureau of Investigation. Archived from the original on 2009-04-17.
  3. ^ "History of the FBI, The New Deal: 1933 - Late 1930s". Federal Bureau of Investigation. Archived from the original on 2015-01-06.
  4. ^ "FBI — A Message to Our Readers". Fbi.gov. Retrieved 2012-12-10.

External linksEdit