FA Women's National League South

The FA Women's National League South is a league in the third level in the women's football pyramid in England, along with the Northern division. These two divisions are part of the FA Women's National League and below the FA Women's Super League and FA Women's Championship.

FA Women's National League South
FA Women's National League.png
SportFootball
Founded1992
No. of teams12
Countries England and
 Wales
Most recent
champion(s)
Coventry United (1 Title)
Level on pyramid3
Promotion toFA Women's Championship
Current sports event 2020–21 FA Women's National League

The league is played on a home and away basis, with each team playing each other twice, and points being awarded in the standard football format. The bottom two clubs are relegated, also on a geographical basis, to the Division One South West, and Division One South East.

Southern Championship teams are eligible to play in the Women's National League Cup as well as the FA Women's Cup.

NameEdit

It was known as the 'Women's Premier League Southern Division' prior to the 2018–19 season.[1]

Current teams (2019–20 season)Edit

Previous winnersEdit

Season Club
2000–01 Brighton & Hove Albion W.F.C.
2001–02 Fulham L.F.C.
2002–03 Bristol Rovers W.F.C. (later Bristol Academy W.F.C., now Bristol City W.F.C.)
2003–04 Bristol City W.F.C. (later AFC Team Bath Ladies, now defunct)
2004–05 Chelsea
2005–06 Cardiff City
2006–07 Watford
2007–08 Fulham
2008–09 Millwall Lionesses
2009–10 Barnet
2010–11 Charlton Athletic
2011–12 Portsmouth
2012–13 Reading
2013–14 Coventry City
2014–15 Portsmouth
2015–16 Brighton & Hove Albion
2016–17 Tottenham Hotspur
2017–18 Charlton Athletic
2018–19 Coventry United

From the 2014–15 season onwards, the club promoted to the FA Women's Championship (via a play-off between the Northern and Southern division champions), and overall champions of the FA Women's National League, are marked in bold.


See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "FA Women's Championship: New name chosen for England's second tier". 26 February 2018. Retrieved 16 November 2018 – via www.bbc.co.uk.

External linksEdit