Ezra F. Kysor

Ezra Frank Kysor (1835–1907) was an American architect from Los Angeles, California. He is believed to be the first professional architect to practice in Southern California.

Pico House, Los Angeles, CA. 1869-70.
Merced Theatre, Los Angeles, CA. 1870.
Samuel C. Foy House, Los Angeles, CA. 1872.
Los Angeles High School, Los Angeles, CA. 1872-73. Demolished.
R. C. Cathedral of St. Vibiana, Los Angeles, CA. 1875-76. Altered.
William H. Perry House, Los Angeles, CA. 1876.
Hazard's Pavilion, Los Angeles, CA. 1887. Demolished.
Palomares Hotel, Pomona, CA. 1887. Burned.

BiographyEdit

Early lifeEdit

Ezra Kysor was born on August 6, 1835, in Cattaraugus, New York.[1] Around the age of thirty, he traveled west to Virginia City, Nevada.[1]

CareerEdit

Upon his arrival in Virginia City c.1865, Kysor established himself as a carpenter.[2] He may also have maintained an architectural office.[1] By 1868, however, he had settled in Los Angeles, California, as an architect.[1]

He practiced alone until March 1875, when he established Kysor & Mathews with Walter J. Mathews (1850-1947).[3] This firm was dissolved in April 1876.[4] He was again alone until 1879, when John F. Hennessy (1853-1924) became a member of Kysor & Hennessy.[5] Hennessy, who was born in Ireland and came to the United States in 1875 or 1876, left Los Angeles for Australia in late 1880.[6]

Upon Hennessy's departure, Kysor made his chief draftsman, Octavius Morgan (1850-1922), a member of Kysor & Morgan. In 1886, John A. Walls (1858-1922) was added, the firm becoming Kysor, Morgan & Walls.[7] It was around this time the Kysor began to withdraw from practice, to focus on real estate speculation. He retired from the firm completely in 1890, which became Morgan & Walls.

Personal lifeEdit

He was married to Clara Perry. They had a son, Charles H. Kysor (1883-1954), who was also an architect.[8]

Architectural worksEdit

Private practice, 1868-1875Edit

Kysor & Mathews, 1875-1876Edit

Private practice, 1876-1878Edit

  • Joseph Mullally House, 850 N. Broadway, Los Angeles, CA (1876) - Demolished.[22][24]
  • Hellman & Mascarel Block, 230-240 N. Main St., Los Angeles, CA (1878) - Demolished.[25]

Kysor & Hennessy, 1879-1880Edit

  • Horticultural Pavilion, Temple St., Los Angeles, CA (1879) - Burned.[26]

Kysor & Morgan, 1880-1886Edit

Kysor, Morgan & Walls, 1886-1890Edit

  • Law Building, 125 Temple St., Los Angeles, CA (1886) - Demolished.[35]
  • Los Angeles National Bank Building, 100-104 N. Spring St., Los Angeles, CA (1886–87) - Demolished.[28]
  • Abstract Title & Insurance Co. Building, 203 New High St., Los Angeles, CA (1887) - Demolished.[36]
  • Granite Bank Building, 230 S. Myrtle Ave., Monrovia, CA (1887) - Demolished.[36]
  • Hazard's Pavilion, 427 W. 5th St., Los Angeles, CA (1887) - Demolished 1905.[37]
  • Los Angeles Orphans' Home, 817 Yale St., Los Angeles, CA (1887) - Demolished.[36]
  • Palomares Hotel, 350 N. Garey Ave., Pomona, CA (1887) - Burned 1911.[36]
  • Michael Sanders House, 1345 Carroll Ave., Los Angeles, CA (1887)[36]
  • Turn Halle, 321 S. Main St., Los Angeles, CA (1887) - Demolished.[38]
  • Gates Building, 215 W. 5th St., Los Angeles, CA (1888) - Demolished.[39]
  • Frank Sabichi House, 2437 S. Figueroa St., Los Angeles, CA (1888) - Demolished.[39]
  • Annex Building, State Normal School, S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles, CA (1889) - Demolished.[40]
  • Gymnasium, State Normal School, S. Grand Ave., Los Angeles, CA (1890) - Demolished.[41]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Ezra Frank Kysor (Architect)". http://pcad.lib.washington.edu/. Pacific Coast Architecture Database. n.d. Web.
  2. ^ Collins, Charles. Mercantile Guide and Directory for Virginia City, Gold Hill, Silver City and American City, 1864-65. San Francisco: Agnew & Deffebach, 1865.
  3. ^ Los Angeles Herald 1 March 1875.
  4. ^ Los Angeles Herald 2 April 1876.
  5. ^ Howard, Rod. "Hennessy, John Francis (Jack) (1853–1924)". http://adb.anu.edu.au/. Australian Dictionary of Biography. 1983. Web.
  6. ^ Los Angeles Herald 22 Sept. 1880.
  7. ^ Los Angeles Herald 27 Oct. 1886.
  8. ^ "Charles H. Kysor (Architect)". http://pcad.lib.washington.edu/. Pacific Coast Architecture Database. n.d. Web.
  9. ^ Farnsworth, R. W. C. A Southern California Paradise. 1883.
  10. ^ Poole, Jean Bruce. El Pueblo: The Historic Heart of Los Angeles. 2002.
  11. ^ Dinkilspiel, Frances. Towers of Gold: How One Jewish Immigrant Named Isaias Hellman Created California. 2008.
  12. ^ "Foy House". https://www.laconservancy.org. n.d.
  13. ^ "Morgan, Octavius". Out West April 1909: 385.
  14. ^ Los Angeles Herald 16 June 1874.
  15. ^ Los Angeles Herald 9 June 1874.
  16. ^ "The Farmers' and Merchants' Bank". Los Angeles Herald. June 14, 1874. p. 3.
  17. ^ Los Angeles Herald 9 May 1874
  18. ^ Los Angeles Herald 22 June 1875.
  19. ^ Los Angeles Herald 10 July 1875.
  20. ^ "The New Roman Catholic Cathedral". Los Angeles Herald 12 March 1876.
  21. ^ Los Angeles Herald 25 June 1875.
  22. ^ a b Los Angeles Herald 1 Jan. 1876.
  23. ^ Los Angeles Herald 1 March 1876.
  24. ^ Los Angeles Herald 11 May 1876.
  25. ^ Los Angeles Herald 18 May 1878.
  26. ^ Los Angeles Herald 4 May 1879.
  27. ^ "University of Southern California - Non-Modern Buildings". https://www.laconservancy.org. n.d. Web.
  28. ^ a b c "Plaza House, 507-511 North Main Street, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA". https://www.loc.gov/. n.d. Web.
  29. ^ Los Angeles Herald 14 June 1882.
  30. ^ Los Angeles Herald 22 July 1882.
  31. ^ Los Angeles Herald 31 Aug. 1883.
  32. ^ Los Angeles Herald 22 Feb. 1884.
  33. ^ Los Angeles Herald 23 July 1884.
  34. ^ "The New Trinity Church". Los Angeles Herald 21 May 1884.
  35. ^ Los Angeles Herald 1 Jan. 1887.
  36. ^ a b c d e Los Angeles Herald 20 Nov. 1887.
  37. ^ Los Angeles Herald 3 Dec. 1886.
  38. ^ Los Angeles Herald 8 April 1887.
  39. ^ a b Inland Architect and News Record Dec. 1888: xvi.
  40. ^ Los Angeles Herald 1 Jan. 1890.
  41. ^ "A Muscle Factory". Los Angeles Herald 30 Aug. 1890.