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Everlane is an American clothing retailer that sells primarily online. The organization is headquartered in San Francisco, California and also has a store in New York City.[1] The company was founded with the mission of selling clothing [2][3] with transparent pricing.[4][5][6]

Everlane, Inc.
IndustryRetail
Founded2010 (2010)
Founders
  • Michael Preysman
  • Jesse Farmer
HeadquartersSan Francisco, California United States
Area served
United States and Canada
Key people
Rebekka Bay (Head of Product and Design)
ProductsWomen's and Men's: Shoes, clothing, bags, accessories
Revenue$40 Million (2017)[citation needed]
Websiteeverlane.com

Contents

HistoryEdit

Everlane was founded in 2010 by Michael Preysman and Jesse Farmer as an online menswear retailer.[2] By 2015, the company had received $1.1 million in seed funding.[7] Everlane started with a referral invite list that gained 60,000 subscribers in 5 days, although the company only had 1,500 T-shirts in inventory.[8] In 2012, Everlane opened a pop-up shop in New York for two weeks during the holidays.[9]

In 2014, Everlane began a partnership with delivery company Postmates to provide same-day delivery to consumers in San Francisco and New York.[10] In 2015, Everlane launched a mobile app, which featured weather updates and suggestions on what to wear for that particular weather.[11]

The company opened permanent stores in SoHo in New York City in 2017 and in San Francisco in 2018.[12][13][14] Everlane has factories in China, Vietnam, Sri Lanka, Italy, Spain, Peru and the United States.[15]

Products and salesEdit

Everlane uses its website and social media to educate customers on its supply chain, factories, employees, and the price breakdown of each product.[16]

The brand expanded into denim in 2017, after Preysman delayed the launch until the company could find a factory that met the business' sustainability standards. Head of product, Kim Smith, eventually found one in Vietnam, that recycles 98% of the water used in denim manufacturing and turns any chemicals used in the process into bricks for constructing affordable houses.[17]

In 2018, the company pledged to stop using virgin plastic by 2021, including in packaging and in clothing made of synthetic fibers.[18][19] On October 24, 2018, Everlane launched ReNew, a line of outerwear crafted from materials that were created out of 3 million recycled plastic bottles.[19] The company plans to accomplish their goal by redeveloping the fabrics, yarns, and all raw materials that contain synthetic fibres into recycled components by 2021.[20] In May 2019, Everlane released the DayGlove ReKnit, a shoe made entirely of recycled plastic bottles.[21]

Everlane holds "Choose What You Pay" sales, which allow shoppers to select one of three prices for a piece of merchandise. The lowest price covers production and shipping cost, while the higher prices cover additional costs such as overhead. The website is transparent about what the cost of the item would cover.[22] Preysman, CEO of Everlane, explained the sale as an attempt to make the brand more transparent.[22]

PublicityEdit

The brand has received publicity via actress Angelina Jolie, who has been seen wearing Everlane loafers[23] and carrying an Everlane tote bag.[24] Model Gigi Hadid has worn Everlane sneakers.[25] The Duchess of Sussex, Meghan Markle, has been photographed wearing an Everlane cashmere sweater.[26]

Awards and honorsEdit

In 2015, founder Michael Preysman was included in Forbes' 30 Under 30 for his work on the firm in "reinventing retail and E-Commerce."[27] Preysman has also been included in the BoF 500, an idex of the people shaping the contemporary fashion industry.[28]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ About Everlane
  2. ^ a b Britt, Aaron (November 20, 2011). "Everlane: Business savvy meets swank". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 2018-11-06.
  3. ^ Shontell, Alyson (March 16, 2012). "Hot Startup Everlane Wants You To Know You're Being Screwed Over By Retailers". Business Insider. Retrieved 2018-11-06 – via San Francisco Chronicle.
  4. ^ Birkner, Christine (May 1, 2017). "How Clothing Brands Are Embracing Transparency to Meet the Growing Demand for Sustainable Apparel; Patagonia, Everlane and PACT lead the trend". Adweek. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |newspaper= (help)
  5. ^ "Price Transparency New Trend Among Emerging Clothing Retailers". CBS New York. April 19, 2017.
  6. ^ Segran, Elizabeth (February 22, 2018). "How Everlane is building the next-gen clothing brand". Fast Company. Retrieved 2018-08-26.
  7. ^ "Everlane". Crunch Base. Retrieved 2015-10-24.
  8. ^ Drell, Lauren (December 17, 2013). "Everlane: 'You Don't Need to Pay a 7x Markup for High-quality Fashion'". Mashable. Retrieved 2015-10-25.
  9. ^ Dillet, Romain (December 13, 2012). "Clothing Startup Everlane Opens A Pop-Up Store In New York, Now Has 400,000 Active Members". TechCrunch. Retrieved 2015-10-18.
  10. ^ Lawler, Ryan (September 9, 2014). "Postmates Partners With Everlane To Bring Customers Select Items On-Demand In San Francisco". TechCrunch. Retrieved 2015-10-18.
  11. ^ Perez, Sarah (July 30, 2015). "Fashion Startup Everlane Arrives on Mobile with an App Catering to its Biggest Fans". TechCrunch. Retrieved 2015-10-18.
  12. ^ Anders, Melissa (November 28, 2017). "Everlane To Open 2 Flagship Locations As More E-Commerce Retailers Go Brick-And-Mortar". Forbes. Retrieved 2018-11-06.
  13. ^ Bhattarai, Abha (November 26, 2017). "Everlane is opening its first stores, after years of swearing it wouldn't". Washington Post. Retrieved 2018-11-06.
  14. ^ Howarth, Dan (March 8, 2018). "Everlane turns historic San Francisco building into minimal clothing store". Dezeen. Retrieved 2018-11-06.
  15. ^ "Factories". Everlane. Retrieved 23 May 2019.
  16. ^ "Everlane: Most Innovative Company". Fast Company. Retrieved 2019-01-26.
  17. ^ Segran, Elizabeth (2018-02-22). "How Everlane Is Building The Next-Gen Clothing Brand". Fast Company. Retrieved 2019-01-26.
  18. ^ Behbehani, Mandy (November 8, 2018). "Everlane sees a future in 'renewed' plastics". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 2018-11-08.
  19. ^ a b Sebra, Matt (2018-10-22). "Everlane Wants to Save the Environment, One Fleece Jacket at a Time". GQ. Retrieved 2019-01-26.
  20. ^ Nast, Condé. "Everlane Wants to Save the Environment, One Fleece Jacket at a Time". GQ. Retrieved 2019-07-29.
  21. ^ "Everlane has dropped a $98 women's flat made of recycled plastic bottles - it might be the most comfortable pair we've ever tried". Business Insider. Retrieved 2019-06-01.
  22. ^ a b "Why Everlane Is Running A "Choose Your Price" Sale". BuzzFeed News. Retrieved 2019-04-08.
  23. ^ Barsamian, Edward (October 28, 2015). "Angelina Jolie Pitt's New Go-To Travel Shoe Is Surprisingly Affordable". Vogue. Retrieved 2016-08-28.
  24. ^ Stern, Claire (March 19, 2014). "Angelina Jolie and Olivia Munn's Favorite Tote Is About to Be Your Favorite Tote, Too". InStyle. Retrieved 2016-08-28.
  25. ^ Madden, Aemilia (March 30, 2016). "Gigi Hadid Wore the Affordable Sneakers Fashion Girls Love". Whowhatwear.
  26. ^ Bennett, Alexis (September 25, 2018). "Meghan Markle's Affordable Cashmere Sweater Is Back in Stock". InStyle. Retrieved 2018-11-22.
  27. ^ O'Conner, Claire (January 5, 2015). "30 under 30: Meet the Young People Reinventing Retail and E-Commerce". Forbes. Retrieved October 18, 2015.
  28. ^ "Michael Preysmanis One of the 500 People Shaping the Global Fashion Industry in 2018". The Business of Fashion. Retrieved 2019-07-29.

External linksEdit