Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches in America

The Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches in America (AEIPA) is a Presbyterian denomination, formed in 2004 in the United States, by churches of Korean and Chinese origin.[1][2][3]

Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches in America
Logo of Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches.png
The logo of Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches in America (EAPCA)
AbbreviationEAPCA
ClassificationProtestant
OrientationReformed
TheologyCalvinist Evangelical
PolityPresbyterian
ModeratorRev. Dr. Tom J. Cowley
RegionUnited States
HeadquartersNew York City, United States
Origin2004
Congregations73 (2022)[1]
Official websitewww.eapca.org

HistoryEdit

In 2004, a group of churches of Korean and Chinese origin organized the Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches in America (AEIPA).[1][2] Tom Cowley has since been elected as its moderator. [4][5][6]

Although the denomination has grown to around 7 presbyteries and 73 churches,[1] its moderator stated in 2012 that most AEIPA churches are made up of just two or three members.[5][4]

StructureEdit

DepartmentsEdit

 
Office of Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches in America

Six departments of the EAPCA include the General Assembly Office, Department of Mission and Church Planting, Department of Communications, Department of Finance, Department of Member Care, and Council of Education and Spiritual Development. Rev. Dr. Tom J. Cowley, the author of A Biography of Jesus,[7] serves as current Moderator.[3]

PresbyteryEdit

As of December 2009, the Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches in America consists of seven geographical presbyteries, of which seventy-three churches coordinate both local and global missions.[5]

DoctrineEdit

The Constitution of the EAPCA includes the Book of Order and the Book of Confessions. The Book of Order is composed of three parts, which are the Book of Government, the Book of Worship, and the Book of Disciplines. The Book of Confessions is composed of four parts, which are the Westminster Confession of Faith, the Westminster Shorter Catechism, the Westminster Larger Catechism, and the EAPCA's own Statement of Fait.[1][8]

The Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches in America is both Evangelical and Presbyterian in its doctrine and tradition, emphasizing the authority of the Bible and importance of mission and education.[9]

Interchurch RelationsEdit

The denomination has participated in the US National Association of Evangelicals and the World Evangelical Alliance.[10][11][12]

SeminarEdit

The denomination administers Olivet University, which exists for the training of its pastors.[4][13]

ControversiesEdit

The denomination's seminary, Olivet University, was founded in 2000 by Rev. David Jang. This pastor was accused in 2012 of promoting the teaching that he was the incarnation of Jesus at his Christ's Second Coming. However, this accusation was denied by Rev. David Jang himself and Rev. Anthony Chiu, secretary of the AEIPA.[14]

In 2018, Rev. Por Douglas Douma of Bible Presbyterian Church accused the AEIPA of being a "ghost denomination" due to the fact that the address of none of its churches is known or the name of any of its pastors. in addition to the moderator.[15]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e "Report on Presbyterian Denominations in the United States". February 15, 2014. Archived from the original on November 11, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  2. ^ a b "Korean Presbyterian Seminars in the United States". Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  3. ^ a b "The Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches in America". Eapca.org. Retrieved 2012-06-21.
  4. ^ a b c "The Glorieta Convention Center moves from NM Batista to Olivet University, based in California". Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  5. ^ a b c "Tom Cowley, AEIPA moderator says most of his churches have two or three members". Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  6. ^ "History of the Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches in America". Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  7. ^ "Amazon.com".
  8. ^ "Doctrines of the Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches in America". Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  9. ^ "The Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches in America". Eapca.org. Retrieved 2012-06-21.
  10. ^ "The Myth of Christian Disunity: Member Denominations of the National Association of Evangelicals". Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  11. ^ "Members of the National Association of Evangelicals of the United States". Archived from the original on October 28, 2014. Retrieved October 28, 2014.
  12. ^ "World Evangelical Alliance opens New York office in partnership with Evangelical Assembly of Presbyterian Churches in America". May 5, 2007. Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  13. ^ "Olivet University, History". Olivetuniversity.edu. Archived from the original on 2012-07-14. Retrieved 2012-06-21.
  14. ^ "Sources in 'Christ's Second Coming Controversy' Face Scrutiny". August 17, 2012. Retrieved January 21, 2022.
  15. ^ "A Phantom Presbyterian Denomination". Retrieved January 21, 2022.