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Eric Hughes (born 17 October 1950) is an English former rugby union and professional rugby league footballer who played the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and coached rugby league in the 1980s and 1990s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for England (Under-15s), and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Widnes (Heritage №), Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs (Heritage № 418), St Helens (Heritage № 984) and the Rochdale Hornets, as a wing, centre or stand-off, i.e. number 2 or 5, or, 3 or 4, or 6,[1] and coached at club level for Widnes, Rochdale Hornets, St Helens, Leigh and the Wigan Warriors.[4] He unwittingly added confusion to the Canterbury-Bankstown Bulldogs team as he was unrelated but played at the same time as the three Australian brothers named Hughes; Garry, Graeme and Mark.

Eric Hughes
Personal information
Full nameEric Hughes
Born (1950-10-17) 17 October 1950 (age 68)
Prescot district, England
Playing information
PositionWing, Centre, Stand-off
Club
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1969–84 Widnes 481 199 1
1976 Canterbury-Bankstown 14 5 0 0 15
1985–86 St. Helens 13 1 0 0 4
1986–≥86 Rochdale Hornets
Total 508 205 0 1 19
Representative
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1975–79 England 10 8 0 0 24
1978–82 Great Britain 8 0 0 0 0
Coaching information
Club
Years Team Gms W D L W%
1984–85 Widnes
1987–88 Rochdale Hornets
1994–96 St. Helens
1996–97 Leigh
Feb 1997–Nov 97 Wigan Warriors 33 19 0 14 58
Total 33 19 0 14 58
Source: [1][2][3][4]

BackgroundEdit

Eric Hughes' birth was registered in Prescot district, Lancashire, England, he was a pupil at Wade Deacon Grammar School, he was later an English language teacher at Bankfield School, Widnes, and he was the landlord of the The Lion public house, Moulton, Cheshire.

Playing careerEdit

International honoursEdit

Eric Hughes won caps for England while at Widnes in the 1975 Rugby League World Cup against Wales, France, New Zealand, Australia (sub), Australia, in 1977 against France, in 1978 against France, and Wales, and in 1979 against Wales, and France,[2] and won caps for Great Britain while at Widnes in 1978 against Australia, in 1979 against Australia (3 matches), and New Zealand (3 matches), and in 1982 against Australia.[3]

Challenge Cup Final appearancesEdit

Eric Hughes played stand-off in Widnes' 14–7 victory over Warrington in the 1975 Challenge Cup Final during the 1974–75 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 10 May 1975, in front of a crowd of 85,998, played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in the 5–20 defeat by St. Helens in the 1976 Challenge Cup Final during the 1975–76 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 8 May 1976, in front of a crowd of 89,982, played stand-off in the 7–16 defeat by Leeds in the 1977 Challenge Cup Final during the 1976–77 at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 7 May 1977, in front of a crowd of 80,871, played stand-off in the 12 3 victory over Wakefield Trinity in the 1979 Challenge Cup Final during the 1978–79 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 5 May 1979, in front of a crowd of 94,218, the 18–9 victory over Hull Kingston Rovers in the 1981 Challenge Cup Final during the 1980–81 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 2 May 1981, in front of a crowd of 92,496, played stand-off in the 14-14 draw with Hull F.C. in the 1982 Challenge Cup Final during the 1981–82 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 1 May 1982, in front of a crowd of 92,147, played stand-off in the 9-18 defeat by Hull F.C. in the 1982 Challenge Cup Final replay during the 1981–82 season at Elland Road, Leeds on Wednesday 19 May 1982, in front of a crowd of 41,171, and played stand-off the 19–6 victory over Wigan in the 1984 Challenge Cup Final during the 1983–84 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 5 May 1984, in front of a crowd of 80,116.

County Cup Final appearancesEdit

Eric Hughes played stand-off, and scored a drop goal in Widnes' 6–2 victory over Salford in the 1974 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1974–75 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 2 November 1974, played stand-off in the 16–7 victory over Salford in the 1975 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1975–76 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 4 October 1975, played stand-off in the 15–13 victory over Workington Town in the 1978 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1978–79 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 7 October 1978, played left-centre, i.e. number 4, in the 11–0 victory over Workington Town in the 1979 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1979–80 season at The Willows, Salford on Saturday 8 December 1979,[5] played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in the 3–8 defeat by Leigh in the 1981 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1981–82 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 26 September 1981, and played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in the 8–12 defeat by Barrow in the 1983 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1983–84 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 1 October 1983.

BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final appearancesEdit

Eric Hughes played stand-off in Widnes' 0-5 defeat by Leigh in the 1972 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final during the 1972–73 season at Central Park, Wigan on Tuesday 19 December 1972, played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in the 7-15 defeat by Bramley in the 1973 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final during the 1973–74 season at Naughton Park, Widnes on Tuesday 18 December 1973, and played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in the 13-7 victory over St. Helens in the 1978 BBC2 Floodlit Trophy Final during the 1978–79 season at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Tuesday 12 December 1978.

Player's No.6 Trophy/John Player/John Player Special Trophy Final appearancesEdit

Eric Hughes played stand-off in Widnes' 2-3 defeat by Bradford Northern in the 1974–75 Player's No.6 Trophy Final during the 1974–75 season at Wilderspool Stadium, Warrington on Saturday 25 January 1975, played stand-off in the 19-13 victory over Hull F.C. in the 1975–76 Player's No.6 Trophy Final during the 1975–76 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 24 January 1976, played left-centre, i.e. number 4, in the 4-9 defeat by Warrington in the 1977–78 Players No.6 Trophy Final during the 1977–78 season at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Saturday 28 January 1978, played stand-off in the 16-4 victory over Warrington in the 1978–79 John Player Trophy Final during the 1978–79 season at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Saturday 28 April 1979, played stand-off in the 0-6 defeat by Bradford Northern in the 1979–80 John Player Trophy Final during the 1979–80 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 5 January 1980, and played stand-off in the 10-18 defeat by Leeds in the 1983–84 John Player Special Trophy Final during the 1983–84 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 14 January 1984.

Coaching careerEdit

Hughes coached Widnes from 1984 to 1985, he resigned following the unforeseen transfer of Joe Lydon to Wigan to alleviate Widnes' financial difficulties, following an approach from Alex Murphy, he returned to playing rugby league signing with St. Helens, he played in 13-matches for St. Helens, winning the first twelve, and then losing the thirteenth, scoring a try in 22-38 defeat by Leeds in the 1985–86 Rugby League Premiership 1st-round match during the 1985–86 season at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Sunday 27 April 1986. He coached Rochdale Hornets for the 1987–88 season. He was coach of St. Helens from January 1994 to January 1996. In 1996, he became Football Manager at St. Helens following the appointment of Shaun McRae as coach, he was appointed head coach at Leigh, he was replaced by Keith Latham in early 1997. He went on to coach Wigan Warriors, replacing Graeme West in February 1997.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. ^ a b "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. ^ a b "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  4. ^ a b "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  5. ^ "Cumbrians lose Lancashire Cup Final". totalrl.com. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.

External linksEdit