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Eric Eyre (born c. 1965) is an American journalist and investigative reporter, best known for winning the Pulitzer Prize in investigative reporting for exposing the opioid crisis in West Virginia. He is currently a statehouse reporter for the Charleston Gazette-Mail.

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CareerEdit

Eyre graduated from Loyola University of New Orleans. He earned his master’s degree in Mass Communication at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg. During his time at the university, Eyre worked as an intern at the St. Petersburg Times. Eyre has reported for The Anniston Star of Alabama, the Daily Times-Advocate of California, and the Pottstown Mercury of Pennsylvania.

In 1998 Eyre began covering education, health, and business at the Charleston Gazette, now the Charleston Gazette-Mail. [1] The Gazette-Mail is a daily morning newspaper in Charleston, West Virginia with a daily print circulation of around 37,000.[2] Eyre is still with the Gazette-Mail, where he balances his work as a full-time statehouse reporter and his pursuit of investigative projects spotlighting issues in the rural communities of West Virginia.[1][3]

Awards and recognitionEdit

Eyre’s work has received national recognition on several occasions. He has been the recipient of the following:

Published worksEdit

Much of Eyre’s work has been published through the Charleston Gazette-Mail. Some of his most notable published works include:

  • “Painkiller Profiteers” (2016)
  • “The Meth Menace” (2013)
  • “Wired for Waste” (2012)
  • “The Well Connected” (2012)
  • “Grants, Graft and Greed at Workforce West Virginia” (2009)
  • “State of Decay: West Virginia's Oral Health Crisis” (2007)
  • “Web of Deceit: The Fall of West Virginia House Education Committee Chairman Jerry Mezzatesta” (2004)
  • “Taken for a Ride” (2003)
  • “The Long Haul and Broken Promises” (2002)
  • “License to Steal” (2002)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Pulitzer.org". www.pulitzer.org. Retrieved 2017-12-06.
  2. ^ "A Pulitzer-Winning Journalist's Advice And Why He Does A Monthly Night Shift".
  3. ^ "WV MetroNews – Eric Eyre's Pulitzer Prize reporting brings drug problem into focus". wvmetronews.com.
  4. ^ "2003 Loeb Awards". UCLA Anderson School of Management. July 1, 2003. Retrieved February 1, 2019.
  5. ^ "UCLA Anderson School of Management Announces 2017 Gerald Loeb Award Winners". UCLA Anderson School of Management. June 27, 2017. Retrieved January 31, 2019.