England women's national rugby union team

The England women's national rugby union team, also known as the Red Roses, represents England in women's international rugby union. They compete in the annual Women's Six Nations Championship with France, Ireland, Italy, Scotland and Wales. England have won the championship on a total of 16 out of 25 occasions – winning the Grand Slam 15 times and the Triple Crown 21 times – making them the most successful side in the tournament's history. They won the Women's Rugby World Cup in 1994 and 2014, and have been runners-up on five other occasions. Their coach is Simon Middleton.

England
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Red Roses
EmblemRed Rose
UnionRugby Football Union
Head coachSimon Middleton
CaptainSarah Hunter
Most capsRochelle Clark (137)
Top scorerEmily Scarratt (640)
Top try scorerSue Day (61)
Home stadiumTwickenham
First colours
Second colours
World Rugby ranking
Current1 (as of 23 November 2020)
Highest1 (2012–2013, 2014–2015, 2017, 2020–)
Lowest4 (2015)
First international
 Wales 4–22 England 
(Pontypool, Wales; 5 April 1987)
Biggest win
 England 101–0 South Africa 
(London, England; 14 May 2005)
Biggest defeat
 New Zealand 67–0 England 
(Burnham, New Zealand; 13 August 1997)
World Cup
Appearances8 (First in 1991)
Best resultChampions, 1994, 2014

HistoryEdit

Until 2009 the badge and logo of England women's national teams was significantly different from that worn by men's teams. However, in 2009 – in anticipation of the merger between the RFU and RFUW – England teams adopted the men's rose.[citation needed]

England have taken part in every Women's Rugby World Cup competition, winning in 1994 and 2014 and finishing as runner-up on five other occasions.

The 1995/1996 season saw the introduction of a Home Nations Championship between England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales, which England won in its inaugural year. England won the Championship every year except from the 1997/98 season when Scotland won it. France joined the competition in the 1998/99 season making it the Five Nations Championship with England achieving the Grand Slam in three successive seasons. In the 2001/02 season, Ireland rejoined the fold in preparation for the World Cup, and the competition expanded to be known as the Six Nations, since when England have finished lower than runner-up on only 2 occasions, in 2013 and 2015 respectively, and have won the title on 9 separate occasions, including in 7 consecutive tournaments between 2006 and 2012 and the Grand Slam on 8 more occasions, including 3 times in a row between 2006–2008 and 2010–2012, respectively.


Results summaryEdit

Top 20 rankings as of 22 November 2021[1]
Rank Change* Team Points
1     England 096.26
2     New Zealand 088.58
3  1   France 088.43
4  1   Canada 088.15
5     Australia 078.68
6     United States 076.63
7     Ireland 076.54
8     Italy 076.43
9     Scotland 073.48
10     Spain 072.10
11     Wales 071.02
12     Japan 065.49
13     South Africa 063.39
14     Russia 061.10
15     Kazakhstan 060.45
16     Samoa 059.72
17     Netherlands 058.27
18     Hong Kong 057.89
19     Sweden 057.73
20     Germany 057.72
*Change from the previous week


Full internationals only

Correct as of 21 November 2021

Opponent First game Played Won Drawn Lost Win %
  Australia 1998 5 5 0 0 100.00%
  Canada 1993 32 28 1 3 87.50%
  France 1991 51 37 0 14 72.55%
  Germany 1997 1 1 0 0 100.00%
  Ireland 1996 27 25 0 2 92.59%
  Italy 1991 22 22 0 0 100.00%
  Kazakhstan 2000 3 3 0 0 100.00%
  Netherlands 1990 4 4 0 0 100.00%
  New Zealand 1997 29 10 1 18 34.48%
  Russia 1994 2 2 0 0 100.00%
  Samoa 2005 2 2 0 0 100.00%
  Scotland 1994 30 28 0 2 93.33%
  South Africa 2005 5 5 0 0 100.00%
  Spain 1991 16 14 1 1 87.50%
  Sweden 1988 3 3 0 0 100.00%
  United States 1991 20 19 0 1 95.00%
  Wales 1987 38 36 0 2 94.74%
Total 1987 290 244 3 43 84.14%

ResultsEdit

See List of England women's national rugby union team matches

World Cup RecordEdit

Rugby World Cup
Year Round Pld W D L PF PA Squad
  1991 Runners-up 6 5 0 1 56 28 Squad
  1994 Champions 6 6 0 0 172 39 Squad
  1998 Third Place 5 4 0 1 219 78 Squad
  2002 Runners-up 4 3 0 1 138 37 Squad
  2006 Runners-up 5 4 0 1 146 47 Squad
  2010 Runners-up 5 4 0 1 171 23 Squad
  2014 Champions 5 4 1 0 184 37 Squad
  2017 Runners-up 5 4 0 1 211 88 Squad
  2021 Squad
Total Champions 41 34 1 6 1217 367
  Champions    Runners-up    Third place    Fourth place Home venue

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

On 7 October 2021, England head coach Simon Middleton announced a 40-player squad for the 2021 Autumn Internationals.[2]

  • Caps updated as of 28 October 2021
Player Position Date of birth (age) Caps Franchise / province
Amy Cokayne Hooker (1996-07-11)11 July 1996 (aged 25) 57 Harlequins
Lark Davies Hooker (1995-03-03)3 March 1995 (aged 26) 31 Loughborough Lightning
Connie Powell Hooker 0 Gloucester-Hartpury
Sarah Bern Prop (1997-07-10)10 July 1997 (aged 24) 36 Bristol Bears
Hannah Botterman Prop (1999-06-08)8 June 1999 (aged 22) 22 Saracens
Shaunagh Brown Prop (1990-03-15)15 March 1990 (aged 31) 24 Harlequins
Bryony Cleall Prop (1992-06-12)12 June 1992 (aged 29) 5 Wasps
Victoria Cornborough Prop (1990-03-03)3 March 1990 (aged 31) 60 Harlequins
Detysha Harper Prop (1998-10-23)23 October 1998 (aged 22) 5 Loughborough Lightning
Zoe Aldcroft Lock (1996-11-19)19 November 1996 (aged 24) 24 Gloucester-Hartpury
Maud Muir Lock (2001-07-12)12 July 2001 (aged 20) 0 Wasps
Catherine O'Donnell Lock (1996-06-13)13 June 1996 (aged 25) 19 Loughborough Lightning
Emily Robinson Lock 0 Harlequins
Abbie Ward Lock (1993-03-27)27 March 1993 (aged 28) 47 Bristol Bears
Sarah Beckett Back row (1999-02-14)14 February 1999 (aged 22) 21 Harlequins
Poppy Cleall Back row (1992-06-12)12 June 1992 (aged 29) 47 Saracens
Victoria Fleetwood Back row (1990-04-13)13 April 1990 (aged 31) 79 Saracens
Sarah Hunter (c) Back row (1985-09-19)19 September 1985 (aged 36) 126 Loughborough Lightning
Sadia Kabeya Back row 0 Loughborough Lightning
Alex Matthews Back row (1993-08-03)3 August 1993 (aged 28) 41 Worcester Warriors
Harriet Millar-Mills Back row (1991-04-16)16 April 1991 (aged 30) 62 Wasps
Marlie Packer Back row (1989-10-02)2 October 1989 (aged 32) 76 Saracens
Claudia MacDonald Scrum-half (1996-01-04)4 January 1996 (aged 25) 15 Wasps
Lucy Packer Scrum-half 0 Harlequins
Leanne Riley Scrum-half (1993-07-18)18 July 1993 (aged 28) 44 Bristol Bears
Flo Robinson Scrum-half (2001-10-04)4 October 2001 (aged 20) 0 Exeter Chiefs
Ella Wyrwas Scrum-half 0 Saracens
Zoe Harrison Fly-half (1998-04-14)14 April 1998 (aged 23) 30 Saracens
Helena Rowland Fly-half (1999-06-30)30 June 1999 (aged 22) 6 Loughborough Lightning
Holly Aitchison Centre (1997-02-21)21 February 1997 (aged 24) 0 Saracens
Amber Reed Centre (1991-04-03)3 April 1991 (aged 30) 58 Bristol Bears
Lagi Tuima Centre (1998-06-16)16 June 1998 (aged 23) 8 Harlequins
Jessica Breach Wing (1997-11-04)4 November 1997 (aged 23) 19 Harlequins
Heather Cowell Wing 0 Harlequins
Abigail Dow Wing (1998-09-29)29 September 1998 (aged 23) 18 Wasps
Lydia Thompson Wing (1992-02-10)10 February 1992 (aged 29) 47 Worcester Warriors
Merryn Doidge Fullback (2000-12-02)2 December 2000 (aged 20) 0 Exeter Chiefs
Ellie Kildunne Fullback (1999-09-08)8 September 1999 (aged 22) 15 Harlequins
Sarah McKenna Fullback (1989-03-23)23 March 1989 (aged 32) 36 Saracens
Emma Sing Fullback 0 Gloucester-Hartpury

HonoursEdit

Winners (2): 1994, 2014[3]
Runners-up (5): 1991, 2002, 2006, 2010, 2017
Winners (16): 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2017, 2019, 2020
Grand Slam (15): 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2017, 2019, 2020
Triple Crown (21): 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020
Winners (5): 1997, 2007, 2008, 2011, 2012
Runners-up (1): 2004

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Women's World Rankings". World Rugby. Retrieved 22 November 2021.
  2. ^ "Red Roses Squad Announced For Autumn Internationals". England Rugby. 7 October 2021. Retrieved 28 October 2021.
  3. ^ James Riach. "England 21-9 Canada – Women's rugby World Cup match report". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 December 2014.

External linksEdit