Emden goose

The Emden or Embden is a German breed of domestic goose. It is named for the town of Emden in north-westernmost Germany.[6][7][8][9][10]

Domestic Goose.jpg
Emden Goose in Tasmania
Conservation statusFAO (2007): not at risk[1]:154
Other names
  • Embden Goose
  • Emder Gans
  • Emdener Gans
Country of originGermany
Distributionworld-wide
Traits
Weight
  • Male:
    11–12 kg[2]
  • Female:
    10–11 kg[2]
Egg colourwhite[2]
Classification
APAheavy goose (1874)[3]
EEyes[4]
PCGBheavy[5]
An Embden goose at the Birmingham Zoo

HistoryEdit

The Emden is the oldest goose breed of the area that is now Germany, with origins believed to go back to the thirteenth century. It derives from the traditional large white geese of the East Frisia region of north-western Germany; these had a long curved neck and so were sometimes known as Schwanengans or "swan geese".[11] The modern breed was established in the late nineteenth century.[12]

In 2016 the breeding population in Germany consisted of 238 female and 132 male birds.[11] In 2020 the conservation status of the Emdener was listed in the Rote Liste of the Gesellschaft zur Erhaltung alter und gefährdeter Haustierrassen in its Category II, stark gefährdet ("seriously endangered").[11]

CharacteristicsEdit

 
A flock of Embden Geese
 
Embden gosling

The Emden is the heaviest goose breed of Germany: ganders may weight up to 12 kg, and reach a height of a metre.[11]

UseEdit

The Emdener may be kept for meat or for eggs; the meat is of good quality. Geese may lay some 50–60 eggs per year, with an average weight of about 170 g.[11][2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Barbara Rischkowsky, D. Pilling (eds.) (2007). List of breeds documented in the Global Databank for Animal Genetic Resources, annex to The State of the World's Animal Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. ISBN 9789251057629. Accessed January 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d Rassetafeln: Emdener Gänse (in German). Bund Deutscher Rassegeflügelzüchter. Accessed March 2020.
  3. ^ APA Recognized Breeds and Varieties: As of January 1, 2012. American Poultry Association. Archived 4 November 2017.
  4. ^ Liste des races et variétés homologuée dans les pays EE (28.04.2013). Entente Européenne d’Aviculture et de Cuniculture. Archived 16 June 2013.
  5. ^ Breed Classification. Poultry Club of Great Britain. Archived 12 June 2018.
  6. ^ Embden. Rare Breeds Survival Trust. Accessed March 2020.
  7. ^ J. Ian H. Allonby, Philippe B. Wilson (editors) (2018). British Poultry Standards: complete specifications and judging points of all standardized breeds and varieties of poultry as compiled by the specialist breed clubs and recognised by the Poultry Club of Great Britain, seventh edition. Chichester; Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley Blackwell. ISBN 9781119509141.
  8. ^ Chris Ashton (2012). Keeping Geese: Breeds and Management. Ramsbury, Marlborough: The Crowood Press. ISBN 9781785000560.
  9. ^ Geese: Medium. Poultry Club of Great Britain. Archived 26 October 2018.
  10. ^ Victoria Roberts (2008). British Poultry Standards: complete specifications and judging points of all standardized breeds and varieties of poultry as compiled by the specialist breed clubs and recognised by the Poultry Club of Great Britain, sixth edition. Oxford: Blackwell. ISBN 9781405156424.
  11. ^ a b c d e Emdener Gänse (in German). Gesellschaft zur Erhaltung alter und gefährdeter Haustierrassen. Archived 8 December 2017.
  12. ^ Breed data sheet: Emdener Gänse / Germany (Goose (domestic)). Domestic Animal Diversity Information System of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Accessed April 2020.

Further readingEdit

  • Batty, Joseph (1996): Domesticated Ducks & Geese: Beech Publishing House. ISBN 1-85736-091-5