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Electoral history of Alexander Mackenzie

Alexander Mackenzie, Second Prime Minister of Canada

This article is the Electoral history of Alexander Mackenzie, the second Prime Minister of Canada. A Liberal, he served one term as Prime Minister (1873 - 1878). He became Prime Minister after defeating the government of Sir John A. Macdonald on a non-confidence motion in 1873 and then winning the general election of 1874. He later lost the general election of 1878 and Macdonald returned to power.

Prior to the creation of Canada in 1867, Mackenzie served in the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada, being elected in two general elections. While a Member of Parliament in the Canadian House of Commons, he also served one term in the Legislative Assembly of Ontario, a practice of dual membership which was permitted at that time. He served as Treasurer of Ontario Dec 1871 - Oct 1872.

Contents

SummaryEdit

 
Canada had seven provinces and one territory during Mackenzie's term as Prime Minister.

Mackenzie ranks thirteenth out of twenty-three prime ministers for time in office, with one term in office (1873-1878).[1] He was in office for a total of 4 years and 336 days. He led the Liberal Party in two general elections, winning one (1874) and losing one (1878).

Mackenzie was the second of five prime ministers from Ontario, the others being Macdonald, Mackenzie Bowell, William Lyon Mackenzie King, and Lester B. Pearson.

Mackenzie stood for election to the House of Commons of Canada eight times, in 1867, 1872, 1873, 1874, 1878, 1882, 1887 and 1891, including one ministerial by-election on becoming Prime Minister in 1873. He was undefeated at the constituency level throughout his parliamentary career. Mackenzie represented two different ridings in Ontario during his time in Parliament: Lambton and York East, Ontario. He served in the House of Commons for a total of 24 years, 6 months and 29 days, continuously from the first Parliament, elected in 1867, until his death in 1892.[2]

Federal general elections, 1874 and 1878Edit

Mackenzie led the Liberal Party in two general elections, winning one (1874) and losing one (1878).

Federal Election, 1874Edit

Prime Minister Mackenzie formed his government in late 1873, after the fall of the Macdonald government in late 1873. Mackenzie called the general election in early 1874. He won a majority and was confirmed in office. Macdonald retained the support of the Conservatives and became the Leader of the Opposition.

Canadian Federal Election, 1874 - Parties, Leaders, Seats Won and Popular Vote
Party Leaders Seats Won Popular Vote
Liberal Alexander Mackenzie1 129 39.5%
  Conservative Sir John A. Macdonald2 39 17.7%
  Liberal-Conservative 26 12.4%
  Independent Liberal 5 2.0%
  Independent 4 3.2%
  Independent Conservative 3 0.7%
  Conservative Labour 0 0.5%
  Unknown3 0 24.0%
Total 206 100.00%
Source: Library of Parliament – History of Federal Ridings since 1867

1 Prime Minister when election was called; Prime Minister after the election.
2 Leader of the Opposition when election was called; Leader of the Opposition after the election.
3 Election returns in 1874 did not require candidates to declare party affiliation. Large numbers of candidates did not list a party affiliation.

Federal Election, 1878Edit

In the 1878 election, Mackenzie and the Liberals were defeated by Macdonald and the Conservatives, who were returned to government.

Canadian Federal Election, 1878 - Parties, Leaders, Seats Won and Popular Vote
Party Leaders Seats Won Popular Vote
  Conservative Sir John A. Macdonald1 85 26.3%
  Liberal-Conservative 49 15.8%
Liberal Alexander Mackenzie2 63 33.0%
  Independent 5 2.7%
  Independent Conservative 2 0.2%
  Independent Liberal 1 1.0%
  Nationalist Conservative 1 0.1%
  Unknown3 0 20.9%
Total 206 100.0%
Source: Library of Parliament – History of Federal Ridings since 1867

1 Leader of the Opposition when election was called; Prime Minister after the election.
2 Prime Minister when election was called; Leader of the Opposition after the election.
3 Election returns in 1878 did not require candidates to declare party affiliation. Large numbers of candidates did not list a party affiliation.

Federal Constituency Elections, 1867 to 1891Edit

Mackenzie stood for election to the House of Commons eight times, in two different ridings in Ontario. He was undefeated throughout his time in the House of Commons.

1867 Federal Election: LambtonEdit

Federal Election, 1867: Lambton, Ontario
Party Candidate Popular Vote %
Liberal   Alexander Mackenzie 1,999 60.4%
  Conservative Alexander Vidal 1,311 39.6%
Total 3,310 100.0%
Source: Library of Parliament – History of Federal Ridings since 1867: Lambton

  Elected.

1872 Federal Election: LambtonEdit

Federal Election, 1872: Lambton, Ontario
Party Candidate Popular Vote %
Liberal   X Alexander Mackenzie 2,190 58.5%
  Conservative J. A. Mackenzie 1,555 41.5%
Total 3,745 100.00%
Source: Library of Parliament – History of Federal Ridings since 1867: Lambton

  Elected.
X Incumbent.

1873 Federal Ministerial By-Election: LambtonEdit

Federal Ministerial By-election, November 25, 1873: Lambton, Ontario
On Mr. Mackenzie being named Minister of Public Works, November 7, 1873
Party Candidate Popular Vote %
Liberal   X Alexander Mackenzie Acclaimed
Total
Source: Library of Parliament – History of Federal Ridings since 1867: Lambton

  Elected.
X Incumbent.

1874 Federal Election: LambtonEdit

Federal Election, 1874: Lambton, Ontario
Party Candidate Popular Vote %
Liberal   X Alexander Mackenzie Acclaimed
Total
Source: Library of Parliament – History of Federal Ridings since 1867: Lambton

  Elected.
X Incumbent.

1878 Federal Election: LambtonEdit

Federal Election, 1878: Lambton, Ontario
Party Candidate Popular Vote %
Liberal   X Alexander Mackenzie 2,707 51.4%
  Conservative J. A. Mackenzie 2,561 48.6%
Total 5,268 100.00%
Source: Library of Parliament – History of Federal Ridings since 1867: Lambton

  Elected.
X Incumbent.

The electoral district of Lambton was abolished in 1882.

1882 Federal Election: York EastEdit

Federal Election, 1882: York East, Ontario
Party Candidate Popular Vote %
Liberal   Alexander Mackenzie 1,857 51.5%
  Conservative X Alfred Boultbee 1,749 48.5%
Total 3,606 100.0%
Source: Library of Parliament – History of Federal Ridings since 1867: York East

  Elected.
X Incumbent.

1887 Federal Election: York EastEdit

Federal Election, 1887: York East, Ontario
Party Candidate Popular Vote %
Liberal   X Alexander Mackenzie 2,551 51.6%
  Conservative Alfred Boultbee 2,391 48.4%
Total 4,942 100.0%
Source: Library of Parliament – History of Federal Ridings since 1867: York East

  Elected.
X Incumbent.

1891 Federal Election: York EastEdit

Federal Election, 1891: York East, Ontario
Party Candidate Popular Vote %
Liberal   X Alexander Mackenzie 3,003 50.2%
  Conservative William Findlay Maclean 2,977 49.8%
Total 5,980 100.0%
Source: Library of Parliament – History of Federal Ridings since 1867: York East

  Elected.
X Incumbent.

Mackenzie served in Parliament until his death in 1892.

Ontario General Election, 1871Edit

Mackenzie served one term as a member of the Provincial Parliament of Ontario, representing the riding of Middlesex West from March 21, 1871 to December 20, 1871.[3] (Prior to 1873, individuals could be elected to both a provincial Legislature and the federal House of Commons, a practice ended by a federal statute enacted in 1873.[4][5])

Province of Canada General elections, 1861-1867Edit

Mackenzie was elected to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada twice, in the provincial general elections of 1861 and 1863, for a total of 6 years in the Legislative Assembly. Throughout this period, he represented the riding of Lambton, Canada West, as a Reformer.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "PARLINFO: Prime Ministers of Canada."
  2. ^ PARLINFO: The Hon. Alexander Mackenzie, P.C.
  3. ^ Legislative Assembly of Ontario: Alexander Mackenzie, MPP.
  4. ^ An Act to render Members of the Legislative Councils and Legislative Assemblies of the Provinces now included, or which may hereafter be included within the Dominion of Canada, ineligible for sitting or voting in the House of Commons of Canada, SC 1873, c. 2.
  5. ^ Marleau and Montpetit, House of Commons Procedure and Practice, 4. The House Of Commons And Its Members.

External linksEdit