Edward A. Lee

Edward Ashford Lee (born October 3, 1957 in Puerto Rico) is an American computer scientist, electrical engineer, and author. He is Professor of the Graduate School and Robert S. Pepper Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) Department at UC Berkeley.[1] Lee works in the areas of cyber-physical systems, embedded systems, and the semantics of programming languages. He is particularly known for his advocacy of deterministic models for the engineering of cyber-physical systems.[2]

Edward A. Lee
EAL18.jpg
Lee in 2018
Born
Edward Ashford Lee

(1957-10-03) October 3, 1957 (age 64)
NationalityAmerican
Notable work
  • Plato and the Nerd (2017)
  • Introduction to Embedded Systems (2017)
  • Digital Communication (2004)
Alma mater
AwardsThe Berkeley Citation (2018), Outstanding Technical Achievement and Leadership Award from the IEEE Technical Committee on Real-Time Systems (TCRTS), Robert S. Pepper Distinguished Professorship (2006-2018), Frederick Emmons Terman Award for Engineering Education (1997), IEEE Fellow, NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award (1987)
Scientific career
FieldsComputer Science, Electrical Engineering
InstitutionsUniversity of California, Berkeley
ThesisA Coupled Hardware and Software Architecture for Programmable Digital Signal Processors (1986)
Doctoral advisorDavid Messerschmitt
Websiteptolemy.berkeley.edu/~eal/

Lee has led the Ptolemy Project, which has created Ptolemy II, an open-source model based design and simulation tool.[3] He ghost-edited a book about this software, where the editor of record is Claudius Ptolemaeus, the 2nd century Greek astronomer, mathematician, and geographer.[4] The Kepler scientific workflow system is based on Ptolemy II.

From 2005 to 2008 Lee was chair of the Electrical Engineering Division and then chair of the EECS Department at UC Berkeley. He has led a number of large research projects at Berkeley, including the Center for Hybrid and Embedded Software Systems (CHESS),[5] the TerraSwarm Research Center,[6] and the Industrial Cyber-Physical Systems Research Center (iCyPhy).[7]

Lee has written several textbooks, covering subjects including embedded systems,[8]digital communications,[9] and signals and systems.[10][11] He has also published two general-audience books, Plato and the Nerd: The Creative Partnership of Humans and Technology[12][13] and The Coevolution: The Entwined Futures of Humans and Machines (2020),[14] where he examines the relationship between humans and technology.[15]

BiographyEdit

Lee was born in San Juan, Puerto Rico in 1957. His father, a prominent businessman and later a bankruptcy lawyer, was a descendant of notable Puerto Ricans Alejandro Tapia y Rivera, a poet and playwright, and Bailey Ashford, a pioneering physician in the treatment of tropical anemia. His mother was originally from Kentucky, but moved around the country many times following her career Army father, Charles P. Nicholas, a mathematician who worked on scientific intelligence[16] during World War II (work for which he was twice awarded the Legion of Merit).[17] Nicholas went on to serve as a member of the original organizing team for national Central Intelligence, and later moved to West Point, where he became head of the Math Department at the United States Military Academy.[17]

At age 14, Lee left home to attend the Lawrenceville School, a boarding school in New Jersey. From there he went to Yale University, where he flitted between majors before settling on a double major in Computer Science and Engineering and Applied Science.[18] In 1979, Lee was hired by Bell Labs, which paid for him to go to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he earned a Science Masters (SM) in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 1980. He then moved back to New Jersey to work at the Bell Labs Holmdel Complex, where he met his future wife, Rhonda Righter. At Bell Labs, Lee worked on the world's first software-defined modem.[19] In 1982, Lee returned to school to get a PhD in the EECS Department at UC Berkeley. In 1986, he finished his PhD and was hired to the faculty at Berkeley, where he has been ever since. In 2018, Lee retired from teaching to focus full-time on research and writing.

BooksEdit

  • The Coevolution: The Entwined Futures of Humans and Machines (2020)[14]
  • Plato and the Nerd: The Creative Partnership of Humans and Technology (2017)[12]
  • Introduction to Embedded Systems: A Cyber-Physical Systems Approach (2017)[8]
  • System Design, Modeling, and Simulation using Ptolemy II (2014)[4]
  • Digital Communication (1988,1994,2004)[20][21][9]
  • Structure and Interpretation of Signals and Systems (2003,2011)[10][11]
  • DSP Processor Fundamentals: Architectures and Features (1997)[22]
  • Software Synthesis from Dataflow Graphs (1996)[23]

AwardsEdit

  • The Berkeley Citation, February, 2018.[1]
  • Outstanding Technical Achievement and Leadership Award from the IEEE Technical Committee on Real-Time Systems (TCRTS), 2016.[24]
  • Robert S. Pepper Distinguished Professorship, UC Berkeley, 2006.[1]
  • ASEE Frederick Emmons Terman Award, 1997.[25]
  • NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award, 1997.[26]

External linksEdit

Interviews and DebatesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Professor Edward A. Lee". ptolemy.berkeley.edu. Retrieved 2018-10-16.
  2. ^ Lohstroh, Marten; Derler, Patricia; Sirjani, Marjan, eds. (2018). Principles of Modeling: Essays Dedicated to Edward A. Lee on the Occasion of His 60th Birthday. LNCS. Vol. 10760. Springer. ISBN 978-3-319-95245-1.
  3. ^ Eker, Johan; Janneck, Jorn; Lee, Edward A.; Liu, Jie; Liu, Xiaojun; Ludvig, Jozef; Sachs, Sonia; Xiong, Yuhong (January 2003). "Taming heterogeneity - the Ptolemy approach". Proceedings of the IEEE. 91 (1): 127–144. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.4.9905. doi:10.1109/JPROC.2002.805829.
  4. ^ a b Ptolemeus, Claudius, ed. (2014). System Design, Modeling, and Simulation using Ptolemy II. Berkeley, CA, USA: ptolemy.org. ISBN 978-1-304-42106-7.
  5. ^ "Chess: Center for Hybrid and Embedded Software Systems". ptolemy.berkeley.edu. Retrieved 2018-10-17.
  6. ^ "The TerraSwarm Research Center". terraswarm.org. Retrieved 2018-10-17.
  7. ^ "Industrial Cyber-Physical Systems Center (iCyPhy)". icyphy.org. Retrieved 2018-10-17.
  8. ^ a b Lee, Edward Ashford; Seshia, Sanjit Arunkumar (2017). Introduction to Embedded Systems: A Cyber-Physical Systems Approach (2nd ed.). Cambridge, MA, USA: MIT Press. ISBN 978-0-262-53381-2.
  9. ^ a b Barry, John R.; Lee, Edward A.; Messerschmitt, David G. (2004). Digital Communication (3d ed.). Springer. ISBN 978-1-4613-4975-4.
  10. ^ a b Lee, Edward A.; Varaiya, Pravin (2003). Structure and Interpretation of Signals and Systems (1st ed.). Boston, MA, USA: Addison Wesley. ISBN 978-0-201-74551-1.
  11. ^ a b Lee, Edward A.; Varaiya, Pravin (2011). Structure and Interpretation of Signals and Systems (2nd ed.). Berkeley, CA, USA: leevaraiya.org. ISBN 978-0-578-07719-2.
  12. ^ a b Lee, Edward Ashford (2017). Plato and the Nerd: The Creative Partnership of Humans and Technology. Cambridge, MA, USA: MIT Press. ISBN 9780262036481.
  13. ^ "PLATO AND THE NERD - Home". platoandthenerd.org. Retrieved 2018-10-16.
  14. ^ a b Lee, Edward A. (2020). The Coevolution: The Entwined Futures of Humans and Machines. Cambridge, MA, USA: MIT Press.
  15. ^ Moira Gunn (2017-12-07). "Episode 17-49 Plato and the Nerd" (Podcast). TechNation Radio podcast. Retrieved 2018-10-15.
  16. ^ Anonymous. Scientific Intelligence (Report). United States Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Archived from the original on March 12, 2008. Retrieved 2019-02-03.
  17. ^ a b Anonymous. Charles Parsons Nicholas (PDF) (Report). United States Military Academy (USMA), West Point, NY. Retrieved 2019-02-03.
  18. ^ Lee, "Plato and the Nerd" p. 279.
  19. ^ Lee, Edward A. (August 27, 1982), "Algorithms for 2400 BPS Full-Duplex Transmission on the Switched Net-work", Technical Memorandum 82-43429-4, Bell Laboratories, Holmdel NJ
  20. ^ Lee, Edward A.; Messerschmitt, David G. (1988). Digital Communication (1st ed.). Kluwer Academic Publishers. ISBN 978-0-89838-274-7.
  21. ^ Lee, Edward A.; Messerschmitt, David G. (1994). Digital Communication (2nd ed.). Kluwer Academic Publishers. ISBN 978-0-7923-9391-7.
  22. ^ Lapsley, Phil; Bier, Jeff; Lee, Edward A. (1997). DSP Processor Fundamentals: Architectures and Features. New York, USA: IEEE Press.
  23. ^ Bhattacharyya, Shuvra A.; Murthy, Praveen K.; Lee, Edward A. (1996). Software Synthesis from Dataflow Graphs. Boston, MA, USA: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
  24. ^ "Achievement and Leadership Awards: IEEE TCRTS". sites.ieee.org/tcrts. Retrieved 2018-10-16.
  25. ^ "ASEE's Frederick Emmons Terman Award". ieee-edusociety.org. Retrieved 2018-10-16.
  26. ^ "NSF Awards in EECS at Berkeley". eecs.berkeley.edu. Retrieved 2018-10-17.