Dorothy Cooper

Dorothy Cooper (née Wright) was an award-winning American screenwriter and TV writer active in the 1940s through the 1970s.

Dorothy Cooper
Born
Dorothy Christy Wright

September 30, 1911
Vermillion, South Dakota, USA
DiedNovember 24, 2004 (aged 93)
Palm Desert, California, USA
EducationUniversity of South Dakota
OccupationScreenwriter

BiographyEdit

Dorothy was born in Vermillion, South Dakota, to Harry Wright and Jessie Christy. After high school, she attended the University of South Dakota, where she majored in journalism and edited the school's humor magazine, The Wet Hen.[1][2][3]

In 1933, after graduation, she moved to Los Angeles, where she got a job working as a telephone operator in Universal City. Four years later, after writing a letter to producer Van Paul, she was offered a job as an extra and then as an assistant script editor. In 1948, she broke into screenwriting with On an Island with You and A Date with Judy.[1]

In the 1950s, she began writing for television. She wrote more than 30 episodes of Father Knows Best and 20 episodes of My Three Sons along with scripts for The Bill Cosby Show and Gidget, among others, having won two Emmys for her work in the medium.[1][3]

She retired sometime during the 1970s, and died in Palm Desert, California, in 2004.[1]

She was married three times: first to G. Leslie Cooper, second to Paul Cerf, and third to Robert Foote.[1][4][5][6]

Selected worksEdit

TVEdit

FilmEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e "Dorothy Cooper Foote | Archives and Special Collections Blog". Retrieved 2019-02-21.
  2. ^ "Robert and Dorothy Cooper Foote, Copacabana, New York, NY, circa 1950s | The University of South Dakota Archives and Special Collections Finding Aids". archives.usd.edu. Retrieved 2019-02-21.
  3. ^ a b "25 Sep 1964, Page 13 - Argus-Leader at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-02-21.
  4. ^ "9 Feb 1955, 36 - The Los Angeles Times at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-02-21.
  5. ^ "3 Dec 2004, Page 35 - The Desert Sun at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-02-21.
  6. ^ "2 Jul 1953, Page 33 - The San Bernardino County Sun at Newspapers.com". Newspapers.com. Retrieved 2019-02-21.