District Council of Port Broughton

The District Council of Port Broughton was a local government area in South Australia from 1892 to 1997 seated at the town of Port Broughton.[1][2]

HistoryEdit

It was proclaimed on 9 June 1892 as the District Council of Mundoora by the severance of the Hundred of Wokurna and a western portion of the Hundred of Mundoora from the District Council of Broughton (later the called District Council of Redhill). It was subdivided into two wards (Mundoora and Wokurna) at its creation.[3][1] The proclamation followed some years of agitation from Port Broughton residents in favour of dividing the original Broughton council.[4] A reserve for a district council chamber at Port Broughton was proclaimed in 1893.[5]

The District Council of Mundoora renamed itself the District Council of Port Broughton on 31 May 1917.[1] In 1933, a portion of the Hundred of Tickera was added to the existing Hundreds of Mundoora and Wokurna, and was added to the Wokurna Ward. In 1936, the council controlled an area of 250 square miles, with 1,340 residents, 280 of them in Port Broughton. The principal industry of the district was wheat growing, with tourism also important in the township itself.[6]

It was abolished in 1997, when it merged with the District Council of Bute to form the District Council of Barunga West.[7]

Neighbouring local governmentEdit

The following adjacent local government bodies co-existed with the Mundoora/Port Broughton council:

ChairmenEdit

  • T. Barker (1892) [6]
  • James Barclay (1896–1905) [8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17]
  • S. March (1908) [18]
  • H. Allchurch (1909–1910) [19][20]
  • James Barclay (1911) [21]
  • James Henry Fletcher (1928–1931) [22]
  • Walter Scott Murray (1940–1944) [22]
  • George Horace Routley (1931–1936) [22]
  • John Sansfield Casey (1936–1940) [22]
  • Joseph Steven James Stringer (1940–1942) [22]
  • George Edward Barnes (1942–1944) [22]
  • Joseph Steven James Stringer (1944–1945) [22]
  • James Henry Fletcher (1946–1949) [22]
  • Thomas Henry Ireland (1949–1950) [22]
  • John Sansfield Casey (1950–1954) [22]
  • Murvin Keith Duffield (1954–1963) [22]
  • Frederick William Schmitt (1963–1968) [22]
  • Kevin James Kerley (1970–1974) [22]
  • Ronald Frank Hewett (1974-?) [22]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Marsden, Susan (2012). "A History of South Australian Councils to 1936" (PDF). Local Government Association of South Australia. p. 41. Retrieved 30 October 2015.
  2. ^ "Cabinet Documents: June 1988". Department of Premier and Cabinet. Archived from the original on 20 March 2016. Retrieved 6 April 2016.
  3. ^ "GOVERNMENT GAZETTE". Adelaide Observer. XLIX (2645). 11 June 1892. p. 32. Retrieved 15 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  4. ^ "DIVISION OF THE BROUGHTON DISTRICT COUNCIL". South Australian Chronicle. XXXIII (1, 671). 30 August 1890. p. 6. Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  5. ^ "GOVERNMENT GAZETTE". The Advertiser. XXXVI (10947). South Australia. 17 November 1893. p. 7. Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ a b Hosking, P. (1936). The Official civic record of South Australia : centenary year, 1936. Adelaide: Universal Publicity Company. p. 813.
  7. ^ "Mid North locals honoured". The Flinders News. 26 January 2016. Retrieved 31 March 2016.
  8. ^ "ALLEGED FORGERY". The Chronicle. 39 (1, 989). South Australia. 3 October 1896. p. 21. Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  9. ^ "ARBOR DAY". The Advertiser. XL (12119). South Australia. 20 August 1897. p. 6. Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  10. ^ "DEPUTATIONS". Evening Journal. XXX (8625). South Australia. 19 July 1898. p. 2 (ONE O'CLOCK EDITION). Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  11. ^ "Deputations". The Register. LXVII (17, 258). South Australia. 7 March 1902. p. 3. Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ "RAILWAY FROM BRINKWORTH TO PORT BROUGHTON". The Northern Argus. XXXI (2, 511). South Australia. 1 September 1899. p. 2. Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  13. ^ "Mundoora District Council". The Laura Standard. X (567). South Australia. 23 March 1900. p. 4. Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  14. ^ "DEPUTATIONS". Adelaide Observer. LVIII (3, 128). 14 September 1901. p. 8 (Supplement to the Adelaide Observer.). Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  15. ^ "MUNDOORA ROADS". The Express and Telegraph. XL (11, 982). South Australia. 11 September 1903. p. 4. Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  16. ^ "CONDITION OF PORT BROUGHTON DEACONS". The Register. LXIX (17, 859). South Australia. 9 February 1904. p. 8. Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  17. ^ "Port Broughton-Mundoora Railway". The Express and Telegraph. XLII (12, 430). South Australia. 3 March 1905. p. 1. Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  18. ^ "BRINKWORTH-PORT BROUGHTON RAILWAY". The Advertiser. LI (15, 596). South Australia. 12 October 1908. p. 11. Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  19. ^ "PORT BROUGHTON WANTS". Evening Journal. XLIII (11943). South Australia. 7 July 1909. p. 2. Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  20. ^ "PORT BROUGHTON". Daily Herald. 1 (166). South Australia. 15 September 1910. p. 13. Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  21. ^ "DEPUTATIONS". The Advertiser. LIV (16, 509). South Australia. 14 September 1911. p. 17. Retrieved 23 April 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Matthews, Penny (1986), South Australia, the civic record, 1836-1986, Wakefield Press, pp. 471–472, ISBN 978-0-949268-82-2

Coordinates: 33°35′0″S 137°56′0″E / 33.58333°S 137.93333°E / -33.58333; 137.93333