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Dehydroretinal, more specifically, 3,4-dehydroretinal, is a derivative metabolite of retinal[1] belonging to the group of vitamin A2 as a retinaldehyde form, besides the endogenously present 3,4-dehydroretinol and 3,4-dehydroretinoic acid.[2][3]

Dehydroretinal
Skeletal formula of dehydroretinal
Ball-and-stick model of the dehydroretinal molecule
Names
Other names
3,4–didehydroretinaldehyde
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
3DMet B00875
ChEBI
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.006.781
EC Number 207-457-7
KEGG
MeSH Dehydroretinal
UNII
Properties
C20H26O
Molar mass 282.42 g/mol
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

The livers of some freshwater fishes and some fish found in India contain a higher ratio of dehydroretinal to retinal than do other species.[4][5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gibney, Michael J.; Margetts, Barrie M.; Kearney, John M.; et al., eds. (2012), Public Health Nutrition, John Wiley & Sons, p. 210, ISBN 1118574222
  2. ^ Törmä H, Vahlquist A (1985). "Biosynthesis of 3-dehydroretinol (vitamin A2) from all-trans-retinol (vitamin A1) in human epidermis". J. Invest. Dermatol. 85 (6): 498–500. PMID 4067325.
  3. ^ Vahlquist A (1980). "The identification of dehydroretinol (vitamin A2) in human skin". Experientia. 36 (3): 317–318. PMID 7371787.
  4. ^ MortonRA, Stubbs AL (1946). "Ling cod and other fish liver oils rich in vitamin A2". Biochem J. 40 (5–6): lix. PMID 20277273.
  5. ^ Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (1967), Requirements of Vitamin A, Thiamine, Riboflavin & Niacin: Report of a Joint Fao-Who Expert Group, United Nations, p. 26, ISBN 9251004536

See alsoEdit