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David Stockton (born June 24, 1991) is an American professional basketball player for the South Bay Lakers of the NBA G League. He played college basketball for Gonzaga University and is the son of NBA Hall of Famer John Stockton.

David Stockton
David Stockton with Reno.JPG
Stockton with Reno Bighorns in 2016
No. 11 – South Bay Lakers
PositionPoint guard
LeagueNBA G League
Personal information
Born (1991-06-24) June 24, 1991 (age 28)
Spokane, Washington
NationalityAmerican
Listed height5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Listed weight165 lb (75 kg)
Career information
High schoolGonzaga Prep (Spokane, Washington)
CollegeGonzaga (2010–2014)
NBA draft2014 / Undrafted
Playing career2014–present
Career history
2014–2015Reno Bighorns
2015Sacramento Kings
2015–2016Reno Bighorns
2016Cedevita Zagreb
2016–2017New Zealand Breakers
2017–2018Reno Bighorns
2018Utah Jazz
2018–2019Medi Bayreuth
2019–presentSouth Bay Lakers
Career highlights and awards
  • NBA D-League All-Rookie Second Team (2015)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

High school careerEdit

Stockton attended Gonzaga Preparatory School in Spokane, Washington. As a senior in 2008–09, he averaged 12.4 points in 20 games as he helped lead the Bullpups to a 24-6 record. He led all scorers with 22 points as Gonzaga Prep defeated Inglemoor 72-64 in overtime to claim fourth place in the 2009 Washington State Class 4A Basketball Tournament. He also quarterbacked Prep's football team to an 8-2 record as senior.[1][2]

College careerEdit

After redshirting the 2009–10 season,[3] Stockton joined the Gonzaga Bulldogs for his freshman season in 2010–11. He appeared in 34 of 35 games off the bench as he averaged 4.2 points, 1.3 rebounds and 2.1 assists in 15.6 minutes per game.[1][4]

In his sophomore season, Stockton started his first career game in the season opener against Eastern Washington, before coming off the bench for the rest of the season. In 33 games, he averaged 3.7 points, 1.0 rebounds and 2.4 assists in 16.8 minutes per game.[1][4]

In his junior season, Stockton appeared in all 35 games with his lone start coming against Lewis-Clark State College. He scored a season-high 13 points against the Warriors to best his 12-point performance opening-night against Southern Utah. He averaged 3.7 points, 1.7 rebounds, 3.4 assists and 1.5 steals in 18.7 minutes per game.[1][4]

In his senior season, Stockton was named to the 2014 WCC All-Tournament Team after helping Gonzaga win the tournament. In 36 games (all starts), he averaged 7.4 points, 2.4 rebounds, 4.2 assists and 1.5 steals in 27.8 minutes per game.[4]

Professional careerEdit

Sacramento Kings and Reno Bighorns (2014–2016)Edit

2014–15 seasonEdit

After going undrafted in the 2014 NBA draft, Stockton joined the Phoenix Suns for the 2014 NBA Summer League. On September 29, 2014, he signed with the Washington Wizards.[5] However, he was later waived by the Wizards on October 3.[6] On November 1, he was selected by the Maine Red Claws in the third round of the 2014 NBA Development League Draft. He was later traded to the Reno Bighorns on draft night.[7]

On February 20, 2015, Stockton signed a 10-day contract with the Sacramento Kings.[8] The next day, he made his NBA debut, recording one point, two rebounds and one assist in the Kings' 126–99 loss to the Los Angeles Clippers.[9] Following the expiry of his contract on March 1, the Kings decided to not re-sign Stockton to a second 10-day contract.[10] On March 2, he was reacquired by Reno, and four days later, he tied the NBA Development League record for most assists in a game with 22 against the Texas Legends.[11] On April 12, he returned to the Kings, signing with them through the 2015–16 season.[12]

2015–16 seasonEdit

In July 2015, Stockton joined the Kings for the 2015 NBA Summer League. On October 22, he was waived by the Kings after appearing in three preseason games.[13] On November 27, he was reacquired by the Reno Bighorns.[14]

2016–17 seasonEdit

In July 2016, Stockton re-joined the Kings for the 2016 NBA Summer League.[15]

Cedevita Zagreb (2016)Edit

On July 23, 2016, Stockton signed a three-year deal with Croatian club Cedevita Zagreb.[16] In early November 2016, he left Cedevita in order to sign in New Zealand.[17][18]

New Zealand Breakers (2016–2017)Edit

On November 10, 2016, Stockton signed with the New Zealand Breakers for the rest of the 2016–17 NBL season, as an injury replacement player for Ben Woodside.[19] He made his debut for the Breakers on November 18, scoring an equal game-high 17 points in 24 minutes off the bench in a 100–85 win over the Illawarra Hawks.[20] On December 2, he recorded a game-high 24 points and 10 assists in a 95–91 loss to Illawarra.[21] He averaged 15 points and 6.5 assists per game over his first four outings with the Breakers, but over his next six games, his numbers dropped considerably, as he failed to record double digits in either points or assists. On January 7, 2017, he was released by the Breakers due to what the club cited as an ongoing back injury.[22][23] In 10 games, he averaged 8.3 points, 2.7 rebounds and 4.2 assists per game.

Return to Reno (2017–2018)Edit

On February 24, 2017, Stockton was reacquired by the Reno Bighorns.[24]

In July 2017, Stockton joined the Phoenix Suns for the 2017 NBA Summer League.[25] He signed with the Sacramento Kings on October 10, 2017,[26] and then waived five days later.[27] On October 22, he was named in the Reno Bighorns 2017–18 training camp roster.[28]

Utah Jazz (2018)Edit

On March 17, 2018, Stockton signed a 10-day contract with the Utah Jazz.[29] He made his debut for the Jazz on March 25, scoring two points off free throws in a 110–91 win over the Golden State Warriors.[30][31] He signed a second 10-day contract on March 27,[32] and a rest-of-season contract on April 6.[33]

Medi Bayreuth (2018–2019)Edit

On August 1, 2018, Stockton signed with Medi Bayreuth of the German Basketball Bundesliga.[34]

South Bay Lakers (2019–present)Edit

On October 4, 2019, Stockton signed with the Los Angeles Lakers.[35] He was waived in training camp but added to the roster of the Lakers' G League affiliate, the South Bay Lakers.[36]

NBA career statisticsEdit

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

Regular seasonEdit

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2014–15 Sacramento 3 0 11.0 .333 .500 .500 .7 3.0 .7 .0 2.7
2017–18 Utah 3 0 3.0 .667 .667 1.000 .0 .0 .0 .0 3.3
Career 6 0 7.0 .444 .600 .700 .3 1.5 .3 .0 3.0

PlayoffsEdit

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2018 Utah 2 0 3.0 .333 .000 .5 .0 .0 .0 1.0
Career 2 0 3.0 .333 .000 .5 .0 .0 .0 1.0

Personal lifeEdit

Stockton is the son of John and Nada Stockton. His father played 19 years for the Utah Jazz and entered the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in 2009. His great-grandfather, Houston Stockton, played football for Gonzaga from 1922 to 1924, going undefeated his senior year of 1924 as he earned All-America honorable mention honors. His eldest brother, Houston Jr., played football for University of Montana, and older brother, Michael, currently plays professionally.[1]

Stockton is eligible for a Croatian passport,[37] because his mother Nada is Croatian.[38]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e "David Stockton Biography". GoZags.com. Archived from the original on November 29, 2014. Retrieved November 20, 2014.
  2. ^ "David Stockton's (Spokane, Washington) High School Basketball Stats". MaxPreps.com. Retrieved November 20, 2014.
  3. ^ Koutroupis, Yannis (May 28, 2014). "Following A Legend: The David Stockton Story". basketballinsiders.com. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  4. ^ a b c d "David Stockton Stats". Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved November 20, 2014.
  5. ^ "Wizards Sign Six for Training Camp". NBA.com. September 29, 2014. Retrieved November 20, 2014.
  6. ^ "WIZARDS WAIVE BLUE AND STOCKTON". MonumentalNetwork.com. October 3, 2014. Retrieved November 20, 2014.
  7. ^ "BIGHORNS FINALIZE TRAINING CAMP ROSTER AFTER D-LEAGUE DRAFT". NBA.com. November 2, 2014. Archived from the original on November 6, 2014. Retrieved November 20, 2014.
  8. ^ "Kings Sign David Stockton to a 10-Day Contract". NBA.com. February 20, 2015. Retrieved February 20, 2015.
  9. ^ "Redick's 24 points help Clippers blow out Kings 126-99". NBA.com. February 21, 2015. Archived from the original on October 25, 2016. Retrieved February 22, 2015.
  10. ^ Herenda, Bill (March 2, 2015). "Source: Stockton will not get second 10-day contract from Kings". csnbayarea.com. Archived from the original on March 4, 2015. Retrieved March 2, 2015.
  11. ^ "Record-Setting Game Leads the Bighorns to Victory". KoloTV.com. March 6, 2015. Retrieved March 7, 2015.
  12. ^ "Kings Sign David Stockton". NBA.com. April 12, 2015. Retrieved April 12, 2015.
  13. ^ "Kings Waive David Stockton". NBA.com. October 22, 2015. Retrieved October 22, 2015.
  14. ^ Jones, Kyle (November 27, 2015). "BIGHORNS ACQUIRE DAVID STOCKTON". NBA.com. Retrieved November 27, 2015.
  15. ^ Lovi, Dan (July 12, 2016). "Stockton Seizing Opportunity". NBA.com. Retrieved July 12, 2016.
  16. ^ "Stockton signed with Cedevita". aba-liga.com. July 23, 2016. Archived from the original on August 19, 2016. Retrieved July 23, 2016.
  17. ^ "David Stockton leaves Cedevita Zagreb, he's signing a deal with New Zealand Breakers". Sportando.com. November 8, 2016. Archived from the original on June 10, 2017. Retrieved November 9, 2016.
  18. ^ Hinton, Marc (November 9, 2016). "NZ Breakers reported to have signed son of NBA great John Stockton". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved November 9, 2016.
  19. ^ "SKYCITY BREAKERS CONFIRM STOCKTON IS THEIR MAN". NZBreakers.co.nz. November 10, 2016. Retrieved November 10, 2016.
  20. ^ "STOCKTON WOWS IN DOMINANT BREAKERS WIN". NBL.com.au. November 18, 2016. Retrieved November 18, 2016.
  21. ^ Hinton, Marc (December 2, 2016). "Red-hot Illawarra Hawks roll past Webster-less NZ Breakers". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved December 2, 2016.
  22. ^ "BREAKERS BRING IN FRESH FACE FOR FINAL REGULAR SEASON PUSH". NZBreakers.co.nz. January 7, 2017. Retrieved January 7, 2017.
  23. ^ "Breakers cut David Stockton and Ben Woodside loose in final regular season push". Stuff.co.nz. January 7, 2017. Retrieved January 7, 2017.
  24. ^ "BIGHORNS RE-ACQUIRE DAVID STOCKTON". NBA.com. February 24, 2017. Retrieved February 25, 2017.
  25. ^ "Phoenix Suns announce roster for NBA Summer League in Las Vegas". ArizonaSports.com. July 3, 2017. Retrieved July 3, 2017.
  26. ^ "Kings Sign Reggie Hearn and David Stockton". NBA.com. October 10, 2017. Retrieved October 10, 2017.
  27. ^ "David Stockton: Waived by Kings". cbssports.com. October 15, 2017. Retrieved October 15, 2017.
  28. ^ "Reno Bighorns announce their training camp..." Twitter. October 22, 2017. Retrieved October 27, 2017.
  29. ^ "Jazz Sign David Stockton to a 10-Day Contract". NBA.com. March 17, 2018. Retrieved March 17, 2018.
  30. ^ Padmore, Zachary (March 25, 2018). "Like father, like son: David Stockton gets first minutes with Utah Jazz". thejnotes.com. Retrieved March 26, 2018.
  31. ^ "David Stockton 2017-18 Game Log". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved March 26, 2018.
  32. ^ Utah Jazz (March 27, 2018). "We've signed David Stockton to a second..." Twitter. Retrieved March 28, 2018.
  33. ^ "Jazz Sign David Stockton for Remainder of the Season". NBA.com. April 6, 2018. Retrieved April 6, 2018.
  34. ^ Bayreuth verpflichtet Sohn von NBA-Legende John Stockton (in German)
  35. ^ "Lakers Sign David Stockton". NBA.com. October 4, 2019. Retrieved October 5, 2019.
  36. ^ "South Bay Lakers Set Opening Night Roster". NBA.com. November 4, 2019. Retrieved November 7, 2019.
  37. ^ "David Stockton getting Croatian passport". Sportando.com. July 12, 2016. Retrieved July 12, 2016.
  38. ^ Horvat, Toni (October 18, 2018). "'AFROHRVAT' U ZAGREBAČKOM KLUBU - David Chavlovich: Zagreb me podsjeća na New York, a kad odem, ne znam kako ću više živjeti bez umaka od tartufa" (in Croatian). 100posto.hr. Retrieved November 5, 2018.

External linksEdit