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David Shilling (born 27 June 1949[citation needed]) is an English milliner, sculptor, fashion and interior designer[1] synonymous with designing extravagant hats and clothing displayed on Ladies' Day at Royal Ascot.[2]

David Shilling
Born
David Shilling

(1949-06-27) 27 June 1949 (age 70)
London, UK
ResidenceMonaco
NationalityBritish
EducationSt Paul's School, London
Parent(s)Gertrude Shilling (deceased, 1999)
Ronald Shilling (deceased, 1988)

Contents

ChildhoodEdit

David Shilling was born in London in 1956[citation needed] and attended St Paul's School, London.[3][4] He began to design hats and outfits at the age of twelve for his mother, Gertrude, until she died in 1999.[5] The hats were designed for Gertrude to wear to the Ascot horse races. At the age of thirteen he began selling toys to his local toyshop, before moving on to sell clothing accessories like scarves to major retailers (for example Fenwick, Fortnum & Mason, and Liberty). He left St Paul's with the aim of pursuing design.

Early tradingEdit

Shilling opened his first store in Marylebone High Street in 1976: two days after its opening the store received an order from a rock star's wife for twenty four hats.[6]

His first collection was purchased in America by Bloomingdale's; and other stores began selling his creations soon afterwards. In the late 1970s Bergdorf Goodman charged up to $3000 for David Shilling hats.

Later activitiesEdit

Shilling subsequently decided to stop the wholesale branch of his hat-making works and focus entirely on made-to-order products.

In 2007 he displayed the first of an expected ten collections of hats (each priced at £1,000,000) at Top Marques Monaco.[7] In November 2009 he held his first show in mainland China at the Ritz-Carlton in Beijing.

Notable eventsEdit

In 1988, the USSR invited Shilling to show his hats during the first Miss USSR Pageant in Moscow, the first live TV broadcast throughout the USSR, which was allegedly viewed by 200 million.[8]

In 1990 he headed a mission for the United Nations in Ecuador which was hugely successful and led to other projects as an art and design ambassador with the UN in Africa and Asia.

In 1994 Shilling was invited to design the emblem for Britain's Festival of Arts and Culture; due to this he became a driving force behind the new "Cool Britannia" rebranding of Britain.[9]

In 1998 his designs for theatre, opera, ballet, film and TV formed an exhibition at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre.[10]

A hat with diamonds created by David in the late 1970s was nominated by the Guinness Book of World Records as the most expensive hat in the world in the 21st century.[11]

In 2012 David Shilling held a preview of a collection of hats designed for men at the Embassy of Monaco, London.

Work on showEdit

Shilling is now a respected fine artist, and is represented by the Redfern Gallery in Cork Street, London and Ferrero Gallery, Nice. His works may also be seen at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York), the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Los Angeles County Museum, the Louvre (Paris) and the Victoria and Albert Museum (London).

One of David Shilling's three-dimensional white canvases is in the United Kingdom Government Art Collection.[12]

In 2005 David's steel sculptures were on display in Regent's Park and are now on show at Holdenby House, Northampton.[13]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Pearson, L. (4 April 2003). "A head for design". The Scotsman. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  2. ^ Freedman, L. (2010). "Vintage hats". BBC Worldwide. Archived from the original on 20 July 2012. Retrieved 25 April 2010.
  3. ^ http://www.answers.com/topic/david-shilling
  4. ^ http://www.davidshilling.com/development.html
  5. ^ http://www.answers.com/topic/david-shilling
  6. ^ http://www.davidshilling.com/development.html
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 7 January 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 21 June 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 7 January 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ http://www.davidshilling.com/uptonow.html
  11. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 7 January 2010. Retrieved 12 April 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  12. ^ http://www.gac.culture.gov.uk/search/Object.asp?object_key=10136
  13. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 23 May 2009. Retrieved 12 April 2010.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

External linksEdit