David F. Gantt

  (Redirected from David Gantt)

David F. Gantt (September 12, 1941  – July 1, 2020) was an American politician who served as a member of the New York Assembly from 1983 to 2020 as a member of the Democratic Party. Prior to his Assembly tenure, he was a member of the Monroe County, New York Legislature.

David F. Gantt
Member of the New York Assembly
In office
January 1, 1983 – July 1, 2020
Preceded byDale Rath
Succeeded byBill Nojay (133rd district)
Vacant (137th district)
Constituency133rd district (1983–2012)
137th district (2013–2020)
Member of the Monroe County, New York Legislature
In office
1973 – December 21, 1982[1]
Succeeded byRon Thomas[2]
Personal details
Born(1941-09-21)September 21, 1941
Opp, Alabama, U.S.
DiedJuly 1, 2020(2020-07-01) (aged 78)
Political partyDemocratic
Children2[3]

Early lifeEdit

David F. Gantt was born on September 12, 1941, in Opp, Alabama, to Lean Gantt and a father who died during David's youth. During the 1950s his family moved to New York as the social services system was better in New York than in the South. In 1960, he graduated from Franklin High School, and later attended the Roberts Wesleyan College and Rochester Institute of Technology.[4][5][3] Gannt attended Roberts Wesleyan College for two years using a partial basketball scholarship, but dropped out due to the financial constraints on his family.[6]

After dropping out of college, he worked for Case-Hoyt Corp. printing company and as a manager at the Anthony Jordan Health Center.[6]

CareerEdit

Monroe County LegislatureEdit

ElectionsEdit

In 1973, Gantt won election to the Monroe County Legislature from the 22nd district, defeating Republican nominee Leonard M. Lofton.[3][7] He won reelection to the county legislature in 1975, 1977, and 1979.[8][9][10]

In 1979, Gantt faced a primary challenge from Joseph Flores, a Hispanic Republican with the endorsement of the Hispanic Political Action Coalition and the Hispanic Women's Caucus, but defeated him in the Democratic primary.[11][12][13] In the general election he defeated Flores, now the Republican nominee.[10]

In 1981, Gantt faced a primary challenge from Marlene Tisdale. In the Democratic primary he defeated Tisdale, and was the only one of seven incumbent county legislators to received the support of the Monroe County Democratic Party that won in the primary election.[14][15] In the general election he defeated Republican nominee Willie C. Anderson.[16]

TenureEdit

In 1977, the Democratic minority in the county legislature attempted to place him onto the Ways and Means Committee, but the Republican majority rejected Gantt in favor of Anthony Reed.[17] After the Democratic Party gained a majority in the county legislature in the 1977 elections Gantt and Michael Ormsby were selected to serve as assistant majority leaders.[18]

In 1980, Gantt was elected as a member of the New York Democratic Party's state committee alongside Marlene Tisdale.[19]

New York AssemblyEdit

ElectionsEdit

On July 15, 1982, Gantt announced that he would seek the Democratic nomination in the New York Assembly's 133rd district to replace Assemblymember Dale Rath.[20] In the Democratic primary, he defeated Anthony Reed and James George.[21] In the general election, Gantt defeated Republican nominee John H. Dixon, Conservative nominee Patricia Brennan, and Right to Life nominee James J. Downs.[22] Gantt became the first black person to elected to the Assembly from the 133rd district.[23]

Gantt was reelected in 1984, 1986, 1988, 1990, and 1992.[24][25][26][27]

In 1988, Gantt faced a primary challenge from Melody Long, one of multiple Lyndon LaRouche supporters who challenged incumbent Democratic members of the Assembly and Senate in the primaries, but defeated Long in the primary.[28][29][30] In the general election he defeated Republican nominee Michael Keller, Conservative nominee Mario Mazzullo, and Right to Life nominee Cheryl Battles.[31]

In June 2020, Gantt announced that he would not seek reelection to the Assembly.[32]

TenureEdit

During the 1983–1985 session of the Assembly Gantt served on the Aging, Commerce, and Election Laws committees.[33] During the 1993–1995 session of the Assembly he served on the Ways and Means, and Steering committees.[34]

During the 1984 Democratic presidential primaries he supported Walter Mondale and ran as a Mondale delegate from the 29th congressional district.[35] He was later selected to serve as a delegate-at-large for Mondale alongside Nancy Padilla.[36] During the 1988 Democratic presidential primaries he supported Jesse Jackson and petitioned to serve as a Jackson delegate from the 29th congressional district.[37]

In 1989, he was selected to serve as the chairman of the state Legislative Commission on the Development of Rural Resources by Speaker Mel Miller.[38] In 1990, he was selected by Miller to replace Angelo Del Toro, who was appointed as Chairman of the Education committee, as co-chairman of the joint Legislative Task Force on Demographic Research and Reapportionment committee, which would reapportion districts based upon the 1990 Census.[39]

In January 1990, Gantt swore in Thomas P. Ryan Jr. for his second term as mayor of Rochester, New York.[40] In 1991, he became the senior member of Monroe County's delegation following the death of Roger J. Robach.[41]

Gantt served as the chairman of the Assembly Transportation Committee.[42]

DeathEdit

On July 1, 2020, Gantt died. Following his death, he was praised by Governor Andrew Cuomo, Attorney General Letitia James, United States Representative Joseph Morelle, Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, Assembly Minority Leader William Barclay, and Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren.[43]

Political positionsEdit

CrimeEdit

In 1983, Gantt introduced legislation that would make the possession of a knife, dagger, or imitation pistol on school grounds a Class A misdemeanor punished with up to one year in prison and a $1,000 fine. He created the legislation in response to the stabbing death of Peter Castle, a school tutor.[44] In 1993, he sponsored legislation that would make the possession of a loaded gun in a school building, playground, athletic field, or within 1,000 feet of schoolyards a felony punishable with six to twenty five years in prison.[45]

In 1990, he voted against legislation that would have reinstituted capital punishment in New York.[46] In 1993, the Assembly voted 61 to 49, with Gantt voting against, in favor of an amendment to the Constitution of New York that would reinstitute capital punishment, but fell below the 2/3rds requirement.[47]

DevelopmentEdit

In 1993, Gantt proposed using $10 million to renovate the Silver Stadium to meet Major League Baseball facility standards and transfer ownership from the Rochester Red Wings to Monroe County.[48][49]

EconomicsEdit

In 1983, Gantt voted in favor of legislation that raised the minimum wage for farm workers from $2.75 to $3.35 per hour.[50]

In 1992, he opposed a sales tax increase from 7% to 8% that was proposed by Monroe County Executive Robert L. King and approved by the Monroe County Legislature.[51] However, Gantt later supported another proposed sales tax increase to 7.5%.[52]

RatingsEdit

In 1989, Gantt was given an 85% rating from the New York Environmental Planning Lobby.[53] In 1990, he was given a 92% rating from the New York Civil Liberties Union.[54]

In 1991, he was given a 20% rating from the Conservative Party of New York State.[55] In 1992, he was given a 0% rating from the Conservative Party.[56]

Electoral historyEdit

David F. Gantt electoral history
1973 Monroe County Legislature 22nd district election[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic David F. Gantt 1,502 70.25%
Republican Leonard M. Lofton 636 29.75%
Total votes 2,138 100.00%
Blank/void 414
1975 Monroe County Legislature 22nd district election[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic David F. Gantt (incumbent) 1,466 72.97%
Republican Rufina Luciano 543 27.03%
Total votes 2,009 100.00%
Blank/void 234
1977 Monroe County Legislature 22nd district election[9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic David F. Gantt (incumbent) 1,097 72.75%
Republican Rufina Luciano 411 27.25%
Total votes 1,508 100.00%
Blank/void 200
1979 Monroe County Legislature 22nd district Democratic primary[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic David F. Gantt (incumbent) 581 67.56%
Democratic Joseph Flores 279 32.44%
Total votes 860 100.00%
1979 Monroe County Legislature 22nd district election[10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic David F. Gantt (incumbent) 1,177 76.13%
Republican Joseph Flores 369 23.87%
Total votes 1,546 100.00%
1981 Monroe County Legislature 22nd district Democratic primary[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic David F. Gantt (incumbent) 704 62.14%
Democratic Marlene Tisdale 429 37.86%
Total votes 1,133 100.00%
1981 Monroe County Legislature 22nd district election[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic David F. Gantt (incumbent) 1,616 78.79%
Republican Willie C. Anderson 435 21.21%
Total votes 2,051 100.00%
1982 New York State Assembly 133rd district election[22]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic David F. Gantt 15,936 62.18%
Liberal David F. Gantt 559 2.18%
Total David F. Gantt 16,495 64.36%
Republican John Henry Dixon 7,101 27.71%
Conservative Patricia H. Brennan 1,534 5.99%
Right to Life James J. Downs 491 1.92%
Write-ins Scattering 8 0.03%
Total votes 25,629 100.00%
Blank/void 4,236
1984 New York State Assembly 133rd district election[24]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic David F. Gantt (incumbent)
Liberal David F. Gantt (incumbent)
Total David F. Gantt (incumbent) 23,656 63.43%
Republican Robert M. Dandrea
Conservative Robert M. Dandrea
First Party Independent Robert M. Dandrea
Total Robert M. Dandrea 13,640 36.57%
Total votes 37,296 100.00%
1986 New York State Assembly 133rd district election[25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic David F. Gantt (incumbent) 16,760 90.58%
Conservative Mario C. Mazzullo 1,704 9.42%
Total votes 18,464 100.00%
1990 New York State Assembly 133rd district election[26][57]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic David F. Gantt (incumbent) 13,222 63.97%
Republican Patricia Millon 5,767 27.90%
Conservative Mario C. Mazzullo 1,680 8.13%
Total votes 20,669 100.00%
1992 New York State Assembly 133rd district election[27]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic David F. Gantt (incumbent) 15,024 79.68%
Conservative Mario C. Mazzullo 2,538 13.46%
Right to Life Deborah Sanders 1,293 6.86%
Total votes 18,855 100.00%

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Gantt leaves Legislature". Democrat and Chronicle. December 22, 1982. p. 15. Archived from the original on July 3, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ "Gantt replacement selected". Democrat and Chronicle. January 10, 1983. p. 34. Archived from the original on July 3, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ a b c "David F. Gantt life details". Democrat and Chronicle. August 4, 2002. p. 6. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "A crusader who just wouldn't give up the fight for the downtrodden". Democrat and Chronicle. February 17, 1985. p. 32. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Gantt Life". Democrat and Chronicle. August 4, 2002. p. 6. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ a b "David Gantt, tireless defender of 'my people,' dies at 78". Democrat and Chronicle. July 2, 2020. Archived from the original on July 3, 2020.
  7. ^ a b "1973 election results". Democrat and Chronicle. December 20, 1973. p. 18. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ a b "1975 election results". Democrat and Chronicle. December 23, 1975. p. 38. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ a b "1977 election results". Democrat and Chronicle. December 30, 1977. p. 29. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ a b c "1979 election results". Democrat and Chronicle. November 7, 1979. p. 1. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "2 Hispanic groups endorse Flores". Democrat and Chronicle. September 6, 1979. p. 14. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "Democrats Reed, Gantt win primaries for legislature seats". Democrat and Chronicle. September 12, 1979. p. 20. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ a b "1979 primary election results". Democrat and Chronicle. September 12, 1979. p. 29. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "Valentino chosen as judge candidate". Democrat and Chronicle. June 17, 1981. p. 29. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ a b "1981 primary election results". Democrat and Chronicle. September 11, 1981. p. 6. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ a b "1981 election results". Democrat and Chronicle. November 4, 1981. p. 1. Archived from the original on July 3, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Democrats protest committee assignment". Democrat and Chronicle. January 10, 1977. p. 9. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "Democrats divide their power". Democrat and Chronicle. November 29, 1977. p. 9. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ "State committee posts". Democrat and Chronicle. September 10, 1980. p. 23. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ "Reed-Proud tie questioned". Democrat and Chronicle. July 15, 1982. p. 12. Archived from the original on July 3, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ "Gantt beats Reed, George in 133rd race". Democrat and Chronicle. September 24, 1982. p. 3. Archived from the original on July 3, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ a b "1982 election results". Democrat and Chronicle. December 12, 1981. p. 1. Archived from the original on July 3, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ "133rd: David Gantt first city black in Assembly". Democrat and Chronicle. November 3, 1982. p. 5. Archived from the original on July 3, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ a b "1984 election results". Democrat and Chronicle. December 30, 1984. p. 1. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ a b "1986 election results". Democrat and Chronicle. December 19, 1986. p. 10. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ a b "1990 election results". Democrat and Chronicle. November 7, 1990. p. 7. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ a b "1992 election results". Democrat and Chronicle. November 4, 1992. p. 10. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ "Democrats warn of LaRouche petitions". Democrat and Chronicle. July 2, 1988. p. 3. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  29. ^ "LaRouche loyalists worry Democrats". Democrat and Chronicle. September 7, 1988. p. 11. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ "LaRouche allies lose soundly". Democrat and Chronicle. September 16, 1988. p. 18. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ "1988 election results". Democrat and Chronicle. November 9, 1988. p. 51. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ "Lewis, Meeks, Orsi, Flagler: One of them will step into David Gantt's shoes". Democrat & Chronicle. June 19, 2020. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020.
  33. ^ "Lessons of a legislative freshman". Democrat and Chronicle. March 22, 1983. p. 7. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ "Gantt is appointed to two state panels". Democrat and Chronicle. January 13, 1993. p. 12. Archived from the original on July 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ "New York primary a complicated affair". Democrat and Chronicle. March 20, 1984. p. 9. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ "Democrats name delegate slate". Democrat and Chronicle. May 30, 1984. p. 12. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  37. ^ "Democrats Petitioning As Delegates". The Ithaca Journal. January 26, 1988. p. 4. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ "Gantt named chairman of rural development". Democrat and Chronicle. January 6, 1989. p. 3. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  39. ^ "Gantt to co-chair panel on districts". Democrat and Chronicle. March 22, 1990. p. 15. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  40. ^ "Ryan takes oath again; talks of city challenges". Democrat and Chronicle. January 2, 1990. p. 1. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  41. ^ "Scrappy Gantt fighting his way to the top". Democrat and Chronicle. February 7, 1993. p. 6. Archived from the original on July 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  42. ^ Orr, Will Cleveland, Brian Sharp and Steve. "David Gantt, tireless defender of 'my people,' dies at 78". Democrat and Chronicle.
  43. ^ "State Assemblyman David Gantt Dies". Spectrum News. July 1, 2020. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020.
  44. ^ "School weapons law asked". Democrat and Chronicle. February 2, 1983. p. 12. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  45. ^ "BIll tells schoolyard gunslingers to butt out". Democrat and Chronicle. March 3, 1993. p. 142. Archived from the original on July 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  46. ^ "Death penalty vote". Democrat and Chronicle. March 2, 1990. p. 2. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  47. ^ "Dems deflect GOP move on death penalty". Democrat and Chronicle. June 8, 1993. p. 1. Archived from the original on July 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  48. ^ "Stadium debate irks chief of league". Democrat and Chronicle. January 6, 1993. p. 109. Archived from the original on July 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  49. ^ "To renovate or not to renovate?". Democrat and Chronicle. January 7, 1993. p. 1. Archived from the original on July 6, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  50. ^ "Farm minimum wage". Democrat and Chronicle. July 3, 1983. p. 20. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  51. ^ "Sales-tax hike asked by county". Democrat and Chronicle. July 16, 1992. p. 79. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  52. ^ "Shuffling on sales". Democrat and Chronicle. December 1, 1992. p. 1. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  53. ^ "Legislature devalued environment issues". Democrat and Chronicle. December 24, 1989. p. 22. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  54. ^ "Civil-liberties group gives Albany report card". Democrat and Chronicle. December 27, 1990. p. 12. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  55. ^ "1991 Conservative Party Ratings". Democrat and Chronicle. September 17, 1991. p. 14. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  56. ^ "Conservative Party rates state lawmakers". Democrat and Chronicle. May 5, 1992. p. 5. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  57. ^ "Democrats capture 2 big races". Democrat and Chronicle. November 7, 1990. p. 7. Archived from the original on July 4, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.

External linksEdit

New York State Assembly
Preceded by
Dale Rath
New York State Assembly
133rd District

1983–2012
Succeeded by
Bill Nojay
Preceded by
Christopher S. Friend
New York State Assembly
137th District

2013–2020
Vacant