Dapplegrim

Dapplegrim (Grimsborken) is a Norwegian fairy tale collected by Peter Christen Asbjørnsen and Jørgen Moe in their Norske Folkeeventyr. Andrew Lang included it in The Red Fairy Book.

Dapplegrim
The Red Fairy Book-247.jpg
Boots, the knight, chooses the best horse in the harras. Illustration by Henry Justice Ford for Andrew Lang's The Red Fairy Book (1890).
Folk tale
NameDapplegrim
Also known asGrimsborken
Data
Aarne-Thompson groupingATU 531 (The Clever Horse)
RegionNorway
Published inNorske Folkeeventyr, by Asbjørnsen and Moe
Related

TranslationsEdit

The tale was published in a compilation of world folktales, by illustrator Katharine Pyle.[1] The tale was also translated and published by George Webbe Dasent.[2]

The tale was translated into French with the title Le Cheval Prodige ("The Prodigious Horse").[3]

Joseph Jacobs inserted the horse Dapplegrim as the giant's mount in his reconstructed protoform of the Norwegian tale The Master Maid, published in Europa's Fairy Book.[4]

AnalysisEdit

George Webbe Dasent stated that the character of Dapplegrim is reminiscent of sagas and tales where hero and steed share a bond of trust.[5]

The Aarne-Thompson-Uther tales types ATU 530, 531 (The Clever Horse) and 533 (The Speaking Horsehead) fall under the umbrella of Supernatural Helper in the folk/fairy tale index and pertain to a cycle of stories in which a magical horse helps the hero or heroine by giving advice and/or instructing him/her.[6]

Peter Christen Asbjørnsen and Jørgen Moe collected a second Norwegian variant of the ATU 531 tale type, titled Gullslottet som hang i luften (English: "The Golden Castle that Hung in the Air").

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Pyle, Katharine. Wonder tales from many lands. London: G.G. Harrap. 1920. pp. 126-145.
  2. ^ Dasent, George Webbe. Popular tales from the Norse. Edinburgh: David Douglas. 1903. pp. 272-285.
  3. ^ Guerber, Hélène Adeline. Contes et légendes. IIme partie. New York, Cincinnati [etc.] American book company. 1895. pp. 30-37. [1]
  4. ^ Jacobs, Joseph. European Folk and Fairy Tales. New York, London: G. P. Putnam's sons. 1916. pp. 142-158.
  5. ^ Dasent, George Webbe. Popular tales from the Norse. Edinburgh: David Douglas. 1903. p. cxxiii.
  6. ^ Thompson, Stith. The Folktale. University of California Press. 1977. pp. 61-65. ISBN 0-520-03537-2

Further readingEdit

  • Asbjørnsen, Peter Christen, Jørgen Moe, Tiina Nunnally, and Neil Gaiman. "Dappleband." In The Complete and Original Norwegian Folktales of Asbjørnsen and Moe, 163-71. Minneapolis; London: University of Minnesota Press, 2019. Accessed November 17, 2020. doi:10.5749/j.ctvrxk3w0.41.

External linksEdit