Curie family

The Curie family is a Polish and French family with a number of illustrious scientists. Several members were awarded the Nobel Prize, including physics, chemistry, or the Nobel Peace Prize. Pierre (French) and Marie Curie (Polish) and their daughter Irène Joliot-Curie, are the most prominent members.

Curie family
Current regionParis, France
Place of originParis, France
Members
Connected families
Distinctions

Family genealogyEdit

 
Family tree

Paul Curie (1799–1853), physician, humanist
x Augustine Hofer (1805–1883), a descendant of the famous scholar and mathematician Johann Bernoulli (1667–1748).

    • Eugene Curie (1827–1910), doctor
      x Sophie-Claire Depouilly (1832-1897).
      • Jacques Curie (1855–1941), physicist
        x Marie Masson (1856–1945).
        • Maurice Curie (1888–1975), physicist.
          • Daniel Curie (1927-2000), physicist.
      • Pierre Curie (1859–1906), physicist, Nobel Prize in 1903.
        x Marie Skłodowska Curie (1867–1934), physicist, chemist, Nobel Prize in 1903 and in 1911.
        • Irène Joliot-Curie (1897–1956), physicist, Nobel Prize in 1935
          x Frédéric Joliot-Curie (1900–1958), physicist, Nobel Prize in 1935.
          • Pierre Joliot-Curie (1932), biologist
            x Anne Gricouroff, biologist, daughter of Georges Gricouroff and Colette Rodet.
            • Marc Joliot (1962), neuroscientist.
            • Alain Joliot (1964), biologist.
          • Hélène Langevin-Joliot (1927), nuclear physicist
            x Michel Langevin (1926–1985), physicist, son of André Langevin and Luce Dubus, grandson of Paul Langevin and Jeanne Desfosses.
            • Françoise Langevin-Mijangos x Christian Mijangos.
            • Yves Langevin (1951),[1] astrophysicist
        • Ève Curie (1904–2007), writer, journalist, pianist
          x Henry Richardson Labouisse, Jr. (1904–1987), American diplomat, Nobel Peace Prize on behalf of UNICEF in 1965.

See alsoEdit


ReferencesEdit

NotesEdit

The Curie family won a total of 5 Nobel Prizes. [2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12]

  1. ^ "Yves Langevin". Archived from the original on 2016-04-22. Retrieved 2016-04-09.
  2. ^ "Marie Curie's Immediate Family Won a Total of Five Nobel Prizes". 7 November 2011. Archived from the original on 2017-08-06. Retrieved 2017-08-06.
  3. ^ "Curie family". Archived from the original on 2019-04-12. Retrieved 2017-08-06.
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-03-11. Retrieved 2017-08-06.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ "Facts on the Nobel Peace Prize". Archived from the original on 2018-08-15. Retrieved 2017-08-06.
  6. ^ Pasachoff, Jay M. (2009-01-22). "When winning a Nobel Prize seems to run in the family". Nature. 457 (7228): 379. Bibcode:2009Natur.457..379P. doi:10.1038/457379b. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 19158770.
  7. ^ "The Magnificent Four Who Received the Nobel Prize Twice". 11 December 2015. Archived from the original on 13 March 2017. Retrieved 6 August 2017.
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2017-01-19. Retrieved 2017-08-06.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ "15 Women Who Have Won Science Nobel Prizes Since Marie Curie". 21 March 2017. Archived from the original on 25 March 2017. Retrieved 6 August 2017.
  10. ^ "The 10 Noblest Nobel Prize Winners of All Time". Archived from the original on 2017-03-16. Retrieved 2017-08-06.
  11. ^ "Marie Curie". Archived from the original on 2017-03-06. Retrieved 2017-08-06.
  12. ^ "Marie Curie: 7 Facts About the Groundbreaking Scientist". Archived from the original on 2016-12-08. Retrieved 2017-08-06.