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The cullagium was a tax first imposed in England and France around the pontificate of Urban II (ca. 1042 – 29 July 1099) and thereafter as part of a drive towards clerical celibacy.[1] It was a tax levied by the state on mistresses kept by clergymen.[2] This was ostensibly to discourage the keeping of such mistresses, a practice officially condemned by both Church and state, but became a convenient source of revenue to the latter.[3]


ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Geoffrey May (1930). "Social control of sex expression". G. Allen & Unwin Ltd. pp. 99–100. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  2. ^ Geoffrey May (1930). "Social control of sex expression". G. Allen & Unwin ltd. pp. 99–100. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  3. ^ Jennifer D. Thibodeaux (2015). "The Manly Priest: Clerical Celibacy, Masculinity, and Reform in England and Normandy". University of Pennsylvania Press. p. 76. Missing or empty |url= (help)

See alsoEdit