A Cubic Mile of Oil

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A Cubic Mile of Oil is a 2010 book by Hewitt Crane, Edwin Kinderman, and Ripudaman Malhotra. The title refers to a unit of energy intended to provide a visualizable scale for comparing large amounts of energy. Defined as the energy released by burning a cubic mile of oil, a "CMO" is approximately equal to 1.6×1020 joule.[1][2][3][4][5] A cubic mile of oil is approximately the worlds yearly consumption of oil and the book examines the possible replacements with other sources. For example, it would require building 32,850 wind turbines or 52 nuclear power plants, each year for 50 years, to obtain in one year the amount of energy contained in one cubic mile of oil.[6]

Cubic mile of oil
Unit ofEnergy
SymbolCMO 
Conversions
1 CMO in ...... is equal to ...
   SI base units   1.6×1020 kg·m2/s2
   SI units   1.6×1020 joule
   CGS units   1.6×1027 erg
   kilowatt hours   4.454×1013 kWh
   British thermal units   1.519×1017 BTU

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Crane, Hewitt; Edwin Kinderman; Ripudaman Malhotra (June 2010). A Cubic Mile of Oil. Oxford University Press USA. ISBN 978-0-19-532554-6.
  2. ^ Dolbear, Geoffrey E. (July 2011). "Book Review: A Cubic Mile of Oil". Fuel. 90 (7): 2553. doi:10.1016/j.fuel.2011.03.004.
  3. ^ Speight, James (13 April 2011). "Book Review: A Cubic Mile of Oil". Energy Sources, Part A: Recovery, Utilization, and Environmental Effects. 33 (12): 1209. doi:10.1080/15567036.2011.552333. ISSN 1556-7036. S2CID 111099959.
  4. ^ Reynolds, Neil (6 October 2010). "Energy use answers can be found in a cubic mile of oil". The Globe and Mail.
  5. ^ "Global energy, cubed". Oil & Gas Journal. 22 November 2010.
  6. ^ Harry Goldstein; William Sweet. "IEEE Spectrum: Joules, BTUs, Quads-Let's Call the Whole Thing Off, How to replace a cubic mile of oil". Retrieved 14 October 2020.

External linksEdit

  • 'Doug Englebart's colloquium' Hewitt Crane discusses the state of the world's energy supply
  • [1] Ripudaman Malhotra talks about A Cubic Mile of Oil at the University of Toledo.
  • [2] Blog for posting updates to A Cubic Mile of Oil.