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Clay Matvick (born August 12, 1973[citation needed] in Saint Cloud, Minnesota) is an American sportscaster, who works primarily as a play-by-play announcer for ABC and the ESPN networks.[1][2][3][4]

BackgroundEdit

Matvick graduated from Princeton High School in 1991. He received a degree in mass communications from St. Cloud State University in 1996.[5]

CareerEdit

Matvick began his broadcasting career in 1990 in his hometown of Princeton, Minnesota at WQPM (now BOB 106). He worked as a weekend sports anchor from 1990 to 1999 at various stations in Minnesota, KDLT in South Dakota and KMTV in Nebraska.[5]

In 1999, Matvick was hired as an anchor for CNN Sports Illustrated in Atlanta, working there until 2001.[4][5]

After leaving CNNSI, Matvick worked for Fox Sports Net North in Minneapolis from 2001-2005.[5]

In 2004, Matvick began play-by-play for the Minnesota Boys High School Hockey Tournament.[5]

In 2006, Matvick joined ESPN, handling play-by-play of college football, college basketball, hockey, baseball, softball and the Little League World Series.

RecognitionEdit

Awards & nominationsEdit

Matvick has won three Upper Midwest regional Emmy awards for his work covering the Minnesota Boys High School Hockey Tournament for KSTC-TV, in 2006,[6] 2007,[7] and 2008.[8]

Personal lifeEdit

He and his wife Lindsay live in Minnesota.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Harry Hurt III (November 28, 2008). "A Rookie Reports From the Syracuse Sidelines". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-06-15.
  2. ^ Sports business resource guide & fact book. Street & Smith's Sports Group. 2007. pp. B150. ISBN 0-9776716-1-5.
  3. ^ "ASA Sportsbeat". American Sportscaters Association. americansportscastersonline.com. May 6, 2010. Retrieved 26 June 2010.
  4. ^ a b c "Official bio". Clay Matvick. claymatvick.com. Archived from the original on 8 July 2011. Retrieved 26 June 2010.
  5. ^ a b c d e editor (November 12, 2008). "Clay Matvick". ESPN. espnmediazone3.com. Archived from the original on 6 July 2010. Retrieved 26 June 2010.
  6. ^ "2006 Regional Emmy Awards Nominees". Midwest Emmys. midwestemmys.org. September 27, 2006. Archived from the original on 26 September 2010. Retrieved 26 June 2010.
  7. ^ "MinnPost wins Regional Emmy for website design". Minnesota Post. minnpost.com. October 25, 2008. Retrieved 26 June 2010.
  8. ^ "2008 Regional Emmy Awards Nominees". Midwest Emmys. midwestemmys.org. March 1, 2009. Archived from the original on 2 July 2010. Retrieved 26 June 2010.

External linksEdit