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Claudia Hürtgen (born 10 September 1971 in Aachen) is a German race driver. Along with Ellen Lohr and Sabine Schmitz, she is one of Germany's best known female racers.

Claudia Hürtgen
Claudia Hürtgen ADAC GT Masters - EuroSpeedway Lausitz 2012.jpg
Born (1971-09-10) 10 September 1971 (age 48)
OccupationAuto racing driver

Hürtgen started her career in karting and moved to German Formula Three. In 1993, during the F3 invitational race of the Monaco Grand Prix weekend, she suffered hand injuries in a roll-over crash, which ended her single-seater career.

She began racing again with touring cars in 1995, winning the Austrian championship, followed with sports car racing, in which she scored class wins, in an LMP-675 class car or a Porsche, in the American Le Mans Series as well as in the 24 Hours of Daytona and the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

In 2000, she returned to the site of her crash, to win the Monaco Historic Grand Prix in a Maserati.

Between 2003 and 2004, she was champion in Germany's Deutsche Tourenwagen Challenge (DTC), which was renamed DMSB-Produktionswagen-Meisterschaft (DPM).

In 2005, Team Schubert and Hürtgen moved on the VLN endurance racing series on the Nürburgring Nordschleife. Hürtgen won the VLN championship in 2005, making her the first female champion since Sabine Schmitz in 1998.

At the 2006 24 Hours Nürburgring, Hürtgen drove two cars for a total of 11 hours, scoring 5th place among 220 cars with a 245 bhp 120d.

24 Hours of Le Mans resultsEdit

Year Team Co-Drivers Car Class Laps Pos. Class
Pos.
1997   GT Racing Team AG
  Roock Racing
  John Robinson
  Hugh Price
Porsche 911 GT2 GT2 280 13th 4th
1998   Roock Racing   Michel Ligonnet
  Robert Nearn
Porsche 911 GT2 GT2 285 17th 3rd
1999   Roock Racing   André Ahrlé
  Vincent Vosse
Porsche 911 GT2 GTS 290 20th 8th
2001   KnightHawk Racing
  Roock Racing International
  Rick Fairbank
  Chris Gleason
Lola B2K/40-Nissan LMP675 94 DNF DNF

External linksEdit

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Thomas Klenke
ADAC Procar Series Champion
2003–2004
Succeeded by
Mathias Schläppi